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7-3-2014

July 3, 2014

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THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 | INYOREGISTER.COM | SERVING THE EASTERN SIERRA AND BEYOND SINCE 1870 | 75¢
The Inyo Register
TODAY’S WEATHER
Sunny
100° HI | 60° LO
FRIDAY
100° | 59°
SATURDAY
98° | 60°
Local movie buffs offer reviews of movies new to DVD and in
theaters See page 17
Fishing is hot and the temperatures, cool in the Eastern Sierra
this holiday weekend See page 20
Copyright ©2014
Horizon Publications, Inc.
Vol. 144, Issue 79
Calendar .........9
Classifieds .... 12
Editorial ......... 4
Horoscopes .. 9
Obituaries ..... 2
Sports ........... 20
TV Listings .... 8
Weather ........ 2
INDEX
“I predict future
happiness for
Americans, if they
can prevent the
government from
wasting the labors
of the people
under the pretense
of taking care of
them.”
– Thomas Jefferson
QUOTE OF THE DAY
Board
votes to
have
Library,
Museum
share staff
Move seen as
making
departments
stretch already
limited resources
By Mike Gervais
Register Staff
County leaders agreed
Tuesday to move forward
with a reorganization of the
Inyo County Library system
and Museum Services
Department, with the caveat
that things can change if the
new system doesn’t work out.
The board voted unani-
mously to allow the Library
to hire a new, part-time
employee. The Eastern
California Museum’s current
part-time employee will now
split time between the
Museum and the Library
(though, an exact schedule of
when the employee will be
working at each department
has not been identified).
“We want to come up with
a comprehensive schedule for
both,” said Deputy County
Administrator Pam Hennarty.
“There are conflicting days of
need.”
The board’s move will pro-
vide a savings of $71,000 for
the county. Hennarty said
that the board’s decision is
not a cut to the Library, but a
re-organization. “Nobody’s
leaving their jobs, we’re not
cutting,” Hennarty said. “It’s
See CUTS E Page 5
Taking the plunge
Bishop youth Jordan Deason enjoys her summer vacation on Tuesday, July 1 by venturing down the
water slide at the Bishop City Park Pool. For more photos of locals beating the heat, see pg. 16.
Photo by Thomas Sills
Bishop Creek
under scrutiny for
contaminants
Heat and drought not helping water
quality numbers in Bishop Creek
By Deb Murphy
Register Staff
Bishop Creek escaped designation as an impaired water body
on a technicality, but steps are being taken to identify and
resolve sources of contamination for both public health con-
cerns and to keep the creek off of the federal Section 303(d)
list.
While the source of the contamination has yet to be identi-
fied, successive drought years and low runoff numbers result in
a higher concentration of bacteria in creeks and streams.
Levels of E. coli and fecal coliform were the topic of a work-
See CREEK E Page 6
Bishop couple
scheduled to go
to trial Oct. 6 for
allegedly stealing
$1.5 million in
public funds
By Mike Gervais
Register Staff
The Inyo County District
Attorney’s Office is preparing
for an Oct. 6, 2014 trial in the
case against Dawndee and
Ken Rossy, the Bishop couple
who stand accused of embez-
zling more than $1.5 million
from Inyo County Health and
Human Services.
Dawndee allegedly stole
the funds over an eight-year
period from HHS’ Public
Assistance Program, where
she worked until last year.
Last month, an Inyo
County Superior Court judge
denied a request from
Dawndee’s attorney to sup-
press statements she made to
law enforcement during the
investigation.
District Attorney Tom
Hardy also said that a settle-
ment conference was held
last month, but did not result
in a settlement on the case.
Hardy said earlier this year
that defense attorneys for the
Rossys had indicated that
they would bee seeking a
change of venue for the trial.
However, as of Wednesday,
Hardy said that motion had
not been filed. He added that
such a motion may at any
time before the Oct. 6 trial
date if a settlement agree-
ment is not reached.
“There will probably be
lots more court dates before
the trial,” Hardy said, adding
that the next court date is a
July 15 settlement confer-
ence.
If a change of venue
request is filed and approved,
the court date may be pushed
D.A. gearing
up for
Rossy trial
Local couple
helped establish
July 4 traditions
in county seat
Eastern California Museum/
Manzanar National Historic Site
This year’s Independence
Fourth of July grand mar-
shals are John K. and Tansy
Smith, long-time
Independence community
members.
Tansy moved to
Independence with her moth-
er and stepfather in the
1930s. She and John met in
See SMITHS E Page 3
Independence honors John and
Tansy Smith as grand marshals
back to provide time to
secure another location for a
trial. However, Hardy said he
is preparing to proceed on
Oct. 6.
“It’s my view that the
defense has adequate time to
prepare and try the case in
October,” Hardy said. “I’m
taking all steps to be ready
on Oct. 6.”
The Rossys are being
charged with a total of 44
felonies associated with the
embezzlement of taxpayer
money that was meant to
assist local residents.
According to investiga-
tors, the money was stolen
from HHS over the course of
five years.
Dawndee, who served as
a manager at Inyo County
HHS, has been charged with
two counts of grand theft,
See TRIAL E Page 3
Tansy Smith John Smith
Dawndee Rossy
Kenneth Rossy
2 THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 The Inyo Register
Rena Mlodecki
Publisher
rena@inyoregister.com
Ext. 222
Cynthia Hurdle Sampietro
Classifieds Manager
classy@inyoregister.com
Ext. 200
Darcy Ellis
Editor
editor@inyoregister.com
Ext. 211
Eva Gentry
Bookkeeping
Circulation Manager
offmgr@inyoregister.com
Ext. 201
Mike Gervais
Sr. Reporter
mgervais@inyoregister.com
Ext. 208
Terry Langdon
Sales Rep
terry@inyoregister.com
Ext. 220
Deb Murphy
Sports Editor
dmurphy@inyoregister.com
Ext. 214
Justin Snyder
Sales Rep
jsnyder@inyoregister.com
Ext. 207
1180 N. Main St., Ste. 108, Bishop, CA 93514 | Phone: (760) 873-3535 | Fax: (760) 873-3591
www.inyoregister.com
The Inyo Register
FRIDAY, JULY 4TH 6:00 ONLY
NIGHTLY 6:00 & 9:15
SATURDAY MATINEE 2:45
2 HRS./35 MINS.
FRIDAY, JULY 4TH 6:15 ONLY
NIGHTLY 6:15 & 9:15
SATURDAY MATINEE 3:00
2 HRS./5 MIN.
Rated
PG-13
July 4-10, 2014 July 4-10, 2014
Rated
PG-13
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Pets of the Week
SAMMY aka SAMANTHA is a 5-year-old purebred German
Shepherd. She is house-trained, gets along dandy with other dogs and
also with children. Sammy would do best in a home that will commit
to her daily exercise and fun, making her a cherished member of the
family.
NORRIS is a super cool, big cuddly orange tabby cat. He has been at
the Shelter since April 19 (more than 2 months)!
July is $10 Adopt-a-Pet Month at the Inyo County Animal Shelter
(includes spay/neuter surgery and first shots).
The Inyo County Animal Shelter has an amazing selection of adorable
cats and lovable dogs. Please adopt one today. Visit in person on
County Road in Big Pine or online at www.ICAREforPets.org. HOURS:
Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m.-
4 p.m. (closed Mondays). Phone: (760) 938-2715.
Photos by Lisa Schade
Daily 3
Monday’s midday picks:
9, 0, 4
Monday’s evening picks:
7, 6, 8
Tuesday’s midday picks:
0, 5, 5
Tuesday’s evening picks:
3, 2, 1
Daily 4
Monday’s picks:
7, 1, 6, 3
Tuesday’s picks:
9, 7, 1, 7
Fantasy 5
Monday’s picks:
6, 10, 16, 27, 34
Tuesday’s picks:
4, 5, 6, 22, 35
Daily Derby
Monday’s picks: First
place No. 8 Gorgeous
George; second place No. 12
Lucky Charms; third place
No. 3 Hot Shot. Winning race
time was 1:49.70.
Tuesday’s picks: First
place No. 7 Eureka; second
place No. 12 Lucky Charms;
third place No. 4 Big Ben.
Winning race time was
1:46.20.
Mega Millions
Numbers for Tuesday,
July 1:
9, 22, 38, 47, 49 15
For additional updates, call
(900) 776-4000 from a touch-
tone phone. This is a toll call. Or,
visit www.calottery.com on the
Internet.
OBITUARY NOTICES
LOTTO
SERVICES
Merwyn “Jim” Paul
Merrick Jr.
June 4, 1925-June 12, 2013
A funeral service will be
held at 9 a.m. today,
Thursday, July 3 at the East
Line Cemetery.
Frances Rowan
Dec. 29, 1925-July 1, 2014
A graveside service will be
held at 1 p.m. today, Thursday,
July 3 at East Line Cemetery
in Bishop.
Dolores Ann Warbington
Oct. 12, 1926-Nov. 24, 2013
A celebration of life will
be held at 3 p.m. today,
Thursday, July 3 at the
Bishop Country Club on
U.S. Highway 395 in
Bishop.
Dennis Hubartt
April 6, 1950-June 21, 2014
A celebration of life will
be held at 4 p.m. Saturday,
July 12 at Izaak Walton
Park on West Line Street in
Bishop.
Jane A. Sauser
July 24, 1920-June 22, 2014
A celebration of life will
be held on Saturday, July
26 at the Sauser family res-
idence, 126 Manzanita Rd.,
Mammoth Lakes.
BIRTH
SAULQUE – Son, Jaxon
Tracy, born on Thursday, June
20, 2014 at Northern Inyo
Hospital in Bishop to Cubby
and Danielle Saulque of
Bishop.
Weight: 7 lbs., 5 oz.
Length: 20 inches
Grandparents: Danny
Webster, and Christian and
Jamery Ray of Bishop.
Also welcoming baby Jaxon
home is sibling Rylan Saulque,
2
1
/2.
To submit a birth announcement for
publication in The Inyo Register, simply
drop by our offices at 1180 N. Main, Ste.
108, Bishop, and pick up one of our
mail-in forms, or write a brief announce-
ment similar to the format above.
Please include a telephone number in
case a question arises.
Dennis Hubartt
1950-2014
Born April 6, 1950 in
Oakland, Dennis Hubartt
passed away June 21, 2014 in
Carson City.
He was preceded in death
by both parents, John and
Ruth Hubartt; and his eldest
son, John Joseph Hubartt.
Dennis retired from Bishop
Elementary School District in
September 2004 after serving
25 years in the grounds/main-
tenance department.
He met his wife Patricia in
high school their freshman
year. They were married in
1969 and have been married
45 years.
He is survived by his wife,
Patricia “Pat” Hubartt; son and
daughter-in-law, Josh and
Melissa Hubartt; daughter and
son-in-law, Cory and Kathleen
Hart; daughter-in-law, Amy
Gundelach; sister, Jean Hubartt;
grandchildren, Sydney and
Bradley Hubartt, Sophia
Hubartt Gundelach, Dorothy
and Olivia Hubartt and Erolinda
Hart; and several nieces, neph-
ews and cousins.
He will be missed and never
forgotten.
A celebration of life will be
held at 4 p.m. Saturday, July 12
at Izaak Walton Park on West
Line Street in Bishop. Please feel
free to come join family in cel-
ebration of Dennis’ memory.
in learning her family geneal-
ogy, and left many great sto-
ries about the family history.
She also wrote many wonder-
ful letters and stories for her
grandchildren. Frances wrote
several articles for genealogi-
cal magazines and wrote two
books for the Tennessee
Historical Society. She loved
writing stories and poems
about her family.
She was a loving Christian
mother and a blessing to her
family. She will be greatly
missed by her family and
friends.
There will be a graveside
service at 1 p.m. today,
Thursday, July 3 at East Line
Cemetery in Bishop.
Donations can be made in
memory of Frances to the
Bishop Senior Center.
Frances Rowan
1925-2014
Frances Rowan passed away
peacefully early Tuesday
morning, July 1, 2014 in
Camarillo. She was born Dec.
29, 1925 in Johnson City,
Tenn.
She and her husband
Kenneth Rowan were married
67 years and lived in Grand
Junction, Colo. before moving
to Bishop in 1970.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Kenneth; four children,
Janice, Fred, Dan and Don; five
grandchildren; and 10 great-
grandchildren.
Frances was very involved
The Inyo Register THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 3
AT A
GLANCE
Have Some Fun and Be a Part of History
Participate In Our Second Annual
“A Day In The Life”
Of Inyo County!
You, your family, your neighbors, your friends and your church have
the opportunity to share…
“a typical day in Inyo County”
On Monday, July 14, 2014,
we are asking anyone who
wants to, to share what
they do that day. Take
written and photographic
accounts of your life on
that day. It can be at home,
at work or at play. We want
to know about the lives of
people in Inyo County.
We will be compiling all of the
photos and information into a
special keepsake edition on
Saturday, July 26, 2014.
No cost to you!
Just Send Us Your Story!
All entries must include your photo!
Send your photos as “jpg” fles with
a resolution of 300 dpi or greater.
Minimum of 4”x5”.
Send your story, photos of your day
and photo of you to:
projects@inyoregister.com
(760) 873-3535
The Inyo Register
07.14.14
The Salvation Army
Thrift Store
1180 N. Main St.
Bishop
in Smart & Final Center
(760) 872-6100
Tues-Sat 9:30-5:00
Wed. Sr. Discount Day
Seniors 35% OFF!
We accept all insurance
CALL DR.
PHILIP
SCHMIDT, D.C.
760-873-7178
389 N. Main St. Suite C • Bishop, CA 93514
www.bishopchiropractic.com
• NAET Allergy
Elimination
• Headache Relief
• Alleviate Neck,
Back & Joint Pain
• Digital X-Ray
McGovern
and Borin
DENTAL
Gentle
Family
& Cosmetic
Dentistry
760-873-3208
OUR
HYGIENE
TEAM
Lori Plakos, RDH
Margie Hooker, RDH
Jan Hornby, RDH
Cara Borin, RDH
TRIAL
Continued from front page
34 counts of identity theft,
two counts of embezzle-
ment, one count of posses-
sion of controlled sub-
stance, one count of welfare
fraud and four counts of
criminal conspiracy.
Ken Rossy is being
charged with one count of
Manor Market
helps local
barrel racer
Kyle Oney of Manor Market contributes to the fundraising
effort to help local barrel racer Kayla Inderbieten defray the
cost of attending the National High School Rodeo Finals,
scheduled for July 13-19 in Rocking Spring, Wyo. Inderbieten
and her horse Pard qualified for nationals during last
month’s state finals, held at the Tri-County Fairgrounds.
Inderbieten finished in second place in a field of 45.
Photo by Deb Murphy
BP book sale
BIG PINE – The Big Pine
Library will be holding its
used book sale all summer
long during library hours.
The library is located at
500 S. Main St.; hours are
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday, 12-5 p.m.;
Wednesday, 2-7 p.m. and
Saturday 10 a.m.-noon and
1-5 p.m.
Airport advisory
BISHOP – The Northern Inyo
Airport Advisory Committee
will hold a special meeting at
5 p.m. Wednesday, July 9 at
the Bishop Airport Terminal
building, 703 Airport Rd.
LPUSD meeting
LONE PINE – The Lone Pine
Unified School District’s June
26 Board of Trustees meeting
was business as usual follow-
ing the county Office of
Education’s decision to
rescind its offer of funds for
the middle school science
center. The offer was predi-
cated on the board adopting a
number of changes in both its
make-up and procedures.
One of the items on the
agenda had been a discussion
of a response to the office’s
offer; that item was moot
with the offer off the table.
The trustees approved the
district budget and Local
Control Accountability Plan
and will proceed with the
interview process for poten-
tial superintendent candi-
dates.
Mosquito fogging
INDEPENDENCE – Owens
Valley Mosquito Abatement
Program staff will be fogging
in Independence before down
today. All operations should
be completed by 6 a.m.
Crews will be using truck-
mounted fogging equipment
in an effort to eradicate
“excessive adult mosquitoes.”
Residents are advised to
prevent mosquito bites by
wearing long pants and long-
sleeved shirts when they are
near mosquitoes in the eve-
ning or early morning hours.
Residents are also encouraged
to wear mosquito repellent if
they are in areas with mosqui-
toes.
For more information, call
the Mosquito abatement pro-
gram at (760) 873-7853.
Crash on 395
BISHOP – A tired driver col-
lided with a Southern
California Edison utility pole
shortly after 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday after dozing off at
the wheel.
According to the California
Highway Patrol, Silas
Thompson, 35, was traveling
east on U.S. 395 west of Pa Ha
Lane in Bishop at 35-50 miles
per hour when he dozed off
for a second. The vehicle
drifted to the right, striking a
curb. Thompson was unable
to react, and his 2006 Toyota
Tacoma continued onto the
sidewalk, where it struck the
utility pole, went into a spin
and struck a plastic fence.
The truck came to rest on the
sidewalk on the south side of
U.S. Highway 395, facing
north.
Thompson was treated for
injuries at Northern inyo
Hospital.
For the record …
The Inyo Register mistak-
enly reported in the Tuesday,
July 1, 2014 article “Inyo
Ready to Celebrate July 4”
that Fourth of July festivities
in Independence were orga-
nized by the Independence
Chamber of Commerce. The
Independence Civic Club is
helping to organize activities,
which will be hosted by sever-
al different community
groups.
The Register also mistaken-
ly identified California High
School Rodeo Association bar-
rel racer Kayla Inderbieten’s
horse as “Tard” in the June
28, 2014 article “Sending
them on their way.” The
horse’s name is, in fact,
“Pard.”
The Register apologizes for
the mistakes.
SMITHS
Continued from front page
college. The two married during World War II,
while John was in the Navy on the East Coast.
They returned together, as soon as they
could, to the Owens Valley, where they oper-
ated the Independence Dairy and ranched.
John’s career with Inyo County govern-
ment spanned 1948-81, and included holding
the offices of Inyo County Road
Commissioner and Inyo County
Administrator. Tansy was home to care for
their household and children. The Smiths
were also part of establishing lasting tradi-
tions for celebrating the Fourth of July in
Independence.
Below are a few of their reflections,
recorded in oral history interviews conducted
by the Eastern California Museum and
Manzanar National Historic Site.
Tansy on Fourth of July in Independence:
“The first one I remember, Anna Kelly was
in charge of the meal, and my mother set up
the parade. And then later on, why, we had
the horse show out here and had everybody
come. All the children arrived from
Independence that were in the 4-H Light
Horse group. They made all their own blan-
kets for their horses, and they made collars
for their horses, and they drilled and rode as
a group. I always really enjoyed seeing them
in the parade.”
John on Fourth of July in Independence
“I was pretty active in the Lions Club, and
I was always down there for that morning
breakfast, and I served up all the eggs!
Johnny Johnson was the other person who
helped, and he taught me how to do a good
job without getting them too well done and
yet well enough so you could eat them. I
cooked eggs there for two or three hours.
Keith Bright was the one who went around
and served coffee to everybody. That was the
Fourth of July as far as I was concerned – the
big breakfast deal and the parade, and the
kids playing games.”
Tansy on Her Love of Animals
“I showed horses when I was younger.
When I came up here, I had a very nice
Quarter stallion that I showed. You could
ride him, drive him, cut cattle on him, jump
… Anything you wanted to do, that horse
would do. He was a real ham.
“I had a little baby coyote that I took care
of, and I had sparrow hawks. The nastiest
thing I ever had was a possum! I had a fox.
I’ve just always liked animals and taking care
of them. For 28 years, we had a bobcat right
here in the house! Oh, he was a sweetheart.”
John on His Work
for Inyo County
“I oiled every road and every street in
every community the first three years I was
road commissioner. I went out and oiled all
the Death Valley and Panamint Valley roads. I
had built that road that goes all the way from
Trona up through where it intersects that
highway that goes from Death Valley.
You can take a guy that comes up here
from L.A. that’s 20 or 30 years old and has
never been in the valley before, and they say:
‘Hey, this is really a dry valley but there are
some beautiful mountains on both sides. So
how come it is so dry on the valley floor? Is
that the way it has always been?’ But if you
take somebody that has lived here in the ’30s
and ’40s and ’20s, they will tell you a whole
different story. Look, water to me is life. I
don’t care who has the water or where it is or
anything else. I have a concern for water. I
carried that philosophy into every meeting
that I had with the Department of Water and
Power.
“If I didn’t do anything else I made darn
sure the public knew what I was doing. I had
that real close relationship with everybody in
the county.”
John on the Owens Valley
“We took a trip over to Europe with our
family years ago and I saw the Alps and all
the mountains and the beautiful area they
have. I didn’t think any of them came to
measure up to these high Sierras. When I got
home, I was happy to get home! Because, to
me, the Owens Valley was the most beauti-
ful place I had been in. So from then on, we
pretty much made up our minds we were
going to be here the rest of our lives, right
here in this Owens Valley. It is a beautiful
valley with beautiful mountains. Everything
about it is outstanding.”
Tansy on the Owens Valley
“I was born in Ventura, in the same hos-
pital that my mother was born in. I’m a
third-generation Californian. I didn’t think
there was any place in the world like
Ventura, and the coast, and the missions,
until I came to Owens Valley. It’s just
breathtaking. We came and took a trip in to
the mountains with our own stock and our
own horses and went clear through the
mountains and back out again. I always
knew that if I had a chance, this was where
I’d want to be.”
Catch both Tansy and John riding in the
Independence July 4 parade tomorrow,
beginning at 10 a.m.
grand theft, one count of
welfare fraud, four counts of
criminal conspiracy and one
count of possession of con-
trolled substance.
The couple was taken
into custody on the charges
last April and later released
on bail. Hardy said the cou-
ple remains out on bail, but
are subject to electronic
monitoring until the court
date.
Hardy said that the two
will be tried together and no
motion to separate the cases
has been made, but “there’s
always a chance the defense
could ask to separate the
case.”
Get the news. Get the story.
www.inyoregister.com
The Inyo Register
Get it in
The Inyo
Register
Classifeds.
Get it in
The Inyo
Register
Classifeds.
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Political cartoons published in this newspaper – as with letters to the editor and op-eds – do not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Inyo Register, its employ-
ees or its parent company. These cartoons are merely intended to present food-for-thought in a different medium. The Inyo Register (ISSN 1095-5089) Published
tri-weekly by Horizon California Publications Inc., 1180 N. Main Street, Ste. 108, Bishop, CA 93514. Entered as a Paid Periodical at the office of Bishop, California 93514,
under the Act of March 3, 1876. Combining Inyo Register, founded 1883; Inyo Independent and Owens Valley Progress-Citizen, founded 1870; and the Sierra Daily News.
All contents are the property of Horizon California Publications Inc. and cannot be reproduced in any way without the written consent of publisher. Postmaster: Send
address changes to The Inyo Register, 1180 N. Main Street, Ste. 108, Bishop, CA 93514. Phone (760) 873-3535. Fax (760) 873-3591
OPINION
RENA MLODECKI Publisher | DARCY ELLIS Editor
THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014
The Inyo Register
4
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Top of the
Morning to you!
“Top of the Morning” is an open platform for all readers
wishing to offer expanded views and opinions on a vari-
ety of subjects; the columns published here range from
political analysis to humorous observations to poignant
reflections on life and living. All subjects and styles are
welcome. If you would like to submit an opinion piece
for “Top of the Morning,” query Editor Darcy Ellis, 760-
873-3535 or editor@inyoregister.com. A submission is
not a guarantee of publication. Certain rules – such as
length (800-1,000 words) and appropriate, slander-free
content – apply. These pieces deadline up to a week
prior to publication, and do not reflect the opinion of
this newspaper or its employees. A photo of the author
is required for publication, along with a brief biographi-
cal statement.
Congress can do, but will it?
By Tim Willoughby
Congress, except in times
of emergency, is a slow and
deliberate institution.
Currently, with Republican
intentions to prevent any-
thing from passing that
might improve the lives of
average Americans, it’s
intentionally slow. Inside
Washington wisdom says
nothing will pass until after
the November elections.
Even the highway bill (involv-
ing an estimated 800,000
jobs) that is usually a bipar-
tisan piece of cake will not
be a cakewalk. The House is
only in session 12 days from
the end of July until after
the election.
The challenge of passing
legislation was brought
home to me recently as I
researched a bit of mining
history, one of my pastimes.
Franklin Roosevelt, who had
a long connection with Wall
Street bankers, knew when
he was elected that the sta-
tus quo would not end the
Depression. The convention-
al mindset was that market
forces would solve it, that
government should do noth-
ing. (Sound familiar?) His
banking friends wanted him
to join European bankers in
forcing the world’s econo-
mies back onto the gold
standard. They believed the
answer to the deflationary
disaster was to stabilize the
international monetary
exchange. Roosevelt believed,
instead, that encouraging
inflation would add money
into the system, creating
consumer spending.
To initiate inflation
Roosevelt raised the price of
silver and ordered the U.S.
mints to buy and coin it.
After the 1929 crash, in
today’s dollars, silver had
dropped to around $5 an
ounce; he raised it to $10.50.
To continue that price he
had to get it approved by
Congress. He entrusted that
task to Senator Pittman of
Nevada who had to over-
come lobbying by Wall Street
Bankers so he built a coali-
tion of farming and western
states. Western states would
benefit from the increase in
the price of silver, and he
put into the bill a provision
to buy surplus agricultural
products that would boost
farm prices. Even in the
emergency of the Depression
it took months to achieve
passage.
Immediately after pas-
sage, mines reopened put-
ting miners back to work,
stock market prices went up
50 percent, the industrial
production index rose near-
ly 100 percent after indus-
trial prices rose, and trading
improved 500 percent.
Those who were employed
saw gains in wages and
there was a noticeable drop
in unemployment. The Silver
Purchase Act of 1934 is
hard to find in the history
books, but it is a great illus-
tration that a Congress of
divergent opinions can
negotiate, compromise, and
pass legislation that helps
all Americans.
2014 marks the 50th
anniversary of the passage
of the Civil Rights and
Wilderness Acts and next
year is the 50th anniversary
of Medicare. History books
record those milestones but
barely mention the difficul-
ty of passage. Fifty years
from now the country will
similarly note the Affordable
Care Act even though many
previous presidents wanted
healthcare reform but were
unable to coax Congress.
Even with one party con-
trolling the presidency,
House, and Senate, as was
the case in 1964, bills of
major significance require
years of effort. Only 13
Republican Senators and 70
Republican House members
voted for Medicare; had
those opposed then used
the tactics of “no” that
Republicans apply today we
would not have Medicare.
Like Republican controlled
states of today squashing
the implementation of the
ACA, it took many years
after passage before
Republican states imple-
mented Medicare.
Experts say Republicans
will control the House until
redistricting takes place
after the 2020 Census.
Certainly, as long as the far
right wing of their party has
influence, it is unlikely any
significant legislation will
pass. The last Congress
broke all records as the “do-
nothing congress” and this
one is on track to surpass
even that disgraceful stan-
dard. Voters recognize the
difference between slow
and deliberate and obsti-
nately obstructive; and they
are losing patience.
November might not be kind
to incumbents.
Even with two parties
willing to work together, it
will still take time, compro-
mise, and creative politick-
ing to pass meaningful leg-
islation, but the long-term
challenges of our nation will
have to be addressed, soon.
(Today’s Top of the
Morning is written by Tim
Willoughby. Willoughby
moved to the Eastern Sierra
more than 10 years ago after
a 30-year career as a teacher
and principal. He was the
Democratic candidate for the
25th Congressional District
in 2004. Willoughby also pens
a weekly local history column
for the Aspen Times.)
I do think it is
important for all of
us to ask: Why for
years has the Library
been taking the only
massive budget cuts
in the county?
TOP OF THE MORNING
GUEST COLUMNIST
County being
disingenuous
about severity of
library cuts
I am concerned about misinfor-
mation and misleading information
being circulated by county offi-
cials.
But first, I want you to know
upfront that I am the daughter of
the Library Director. If this fact
makes you doubt my words, then
I’d rather you know right away than
realize it later. That said, as some-
one who feels strongly that the
people’s access to free information
is an absolute necessity of a healthy
republic, my words and actions
would be the same no matter my
relation to the library.
At the Board of Supervisors
meeting of July 1, I stated during
public comment that the Inyo
County Free Library budget for
Fiscal Year 2014 (decided by the
Board in August 2013) had been cut
by 27 percent. I also said that the
library had lost more than 50% of
its staff in the past five years.
One board member corrected
me, stating that he did not know
where this 27 percent came from.
The library, according to him (and
later in the meeting, according the
the County Administrative Officer),
had been cut by 7 percent.
I’m always open to the option
that I may have been wrong, so I
spent the afternoon of July 1 read-
ing the Budget Books and support
documents. It turns out I was
wrong. But so is the board, and so
is the CAO. Here are the numbers,
but I would like everyone to know
that the county budget and supple-
ments are public documents. You
have the right to request these
documents so you don’t have to
take anyone’s word for it, mine
included.
For the Fiscal Year ending June
30, 2013, the Board of Supervisors
approved a library budget of
$649,477. For the Fiscal Year end-
ing June 30, 2014, the Board of
Supervisors approved a library bud-
get of $493,673. The difference
between the two is $155,714, which
amounts to a 24 percent cut of the
total library budget.
However, since it is useless to
speak of any department’s budget
without considering the staff who
actually run the department, it is
instructive to look at the cuts made
to the library personnel salaries
and benefits. For the Fiscal Year
ending June 30, 2013, the Board of
Supervisors approved library sala-
ries and benefits in the amount of
$575,475. For the Fiscal Year end-
ing June 30, 2014, the Board of
Supervisors approved library sala-
ries and benefits in the amount of
$401,852. The difference between
the two is $173,623, which amounts
to a 30 percent cut of the library
personnel salaries and benefits.
Furthermore, in the last five
years the library has lost more than
50 percent of its staff. These work-
ers have not been replaced.
As I looked through the FY 2013-
2014 Budget Book, I did not find
any other General Fund depart-
ments impacted in a way even
remotely comparable to this level
of cutting.
I am trying to understand this
claim by the Board and CAO that
the library was cut by only 7 per-
cent last year. It seems that they
must be comparing the Year To
Date Actuals for FY2013 to the
Board Approved library budget for
FY 2014. What the YTD Actuals
reflect is this: the Library managed
to save money through frugality
(like ordering used books instead
of new books), but the Library also
did not spend out its budget
because staff retired and were not
replaced. Basing a budget cut upon
this number, then claiming the cut
was only 7 percent, is the same as
punishing a department for saving
money and for losing staff.
This is important because the
budget cuts to the Library have
been cumulative over many years.
(By the way, I refuse to use the mis-
leading euphemism “money sav-
ings” instead of saying budget cuts,
as the Deputy CAO and Board
Members requested at the July 1
meeting.) The decision the Board
made on July 1, 2014, which results
in another significant cut to the
Library, cannot equitably be consid-
ered by itself: this cut must be
viewed together with the 24 per-
cent surprise cut to the Library
budget for FY 2013-2014, as well as
with the unmitigated loss of 9 out
of 16 staff members since 2008.
These numbers speak for them-
selves, so I’m not going to summa-
rize with my thoughts. However, I
do think it is important for all of us
to ask: Why for years has the Library
been taking the only massive bud-
get cuts in the county?
If anyone does not have time to
go request these budget documents,
I would be happy to share them
with you. Please feel free to email
me at rosemary.star@gmail.com.
I also welcome any and all
response to this letter, because I
believe that public discourse among
the people and with elected offi-
cials – especially at a Board of
Supervisors meeting – is as essen-
tial a part of healthy government as
is access to your Free Public
Library.
Rose Masters
Independence
Supreme Court
decision a setback
for U.S. workforce
In Citizens United, the Supreme
Court ruled that corporations are
persons. Now, with their ruling
granting Hobby Lobby and
Conestoga Wood Specialties the
right to exempt contraception from
the health care coverage they pro-
vide their employees, they are
churches as well: Churches that
have the power to withhold benefits
based on what the boss believes the
employees might choose to do with
them.
This ruling manages to accom-
plish several things at once, all of
them bad. By allowing an employer
to decide what it will cover it
extends corporate power into work-
ers’ private lives. It obviously heart-
ens Obamacare’s opponents by giv-
ing them by judicial fiat what the
nation’s voters failed to – a wedge
with which they can pry the man-
date upon which it is based apart.
And the Christian Right, which
devoutly believes women are too
stupid to be allowed to make their
own choices, is positively ecstatic.
As well they should be, because
while the wording in the Supreme
Court’s decision claims this ruling
is limited, anyone with even a basic
knowledge of how American law
works knows legal decisions are
based on precedent here. The prec-
edent is now established. Anyone
who believes that corporate hon-
chos will not go through their
health plans and cherry pick what
they will or will not cover based on
their own personal beliefs – what-
ever they may be – is outright
crazy. They’d be crazy not to. In
addition to giving the boss leave to
impose his moral agenda on his
work force, it will save him money
in benefit costs as well.
What’s good for Hobby Lobby
and Conestoga Wood Specialties
will be good for every other self
righteous crusader who believes
they should have the right to impose
their personal views on their work
force. Too bad about the rest of
us. Monday was a black day for
American jurisprudence.
Carne Lowgren
Bishop
The Inyo Register THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 5
Make Your Pet
A
Star!
In The Inyo Register’s
Pet Photo Contest!
Photo entry deadline Wed. July 9, 2014
Photos printed in paper with
official ballot: Tues., July 15, 2014
Ballots from voters due: Fri., July 18, 2014
Winners announced in The Inyo Register:
Thursday, July 24, 2014
RULES: Entry fee for each picture submitted: $10
($5 of this fee goes to The Inyo County Animal Shelter)
All entries must be received by 5 p.m., Wednesday, July 9, 2014.
Email photos and entry form information to: classy@inyoregister.com
Drop or mail photos, entries & payment to:
The Inyo Register, 1180 N. Main St., Suite 108, Bishop, CA 93514
Drop Box available after hours; be sure to include $10 entry fee
Call 760-873-3535 for any questions.
Our readers will be voting for these four categories
Inyo RegIsteR Pet Contest entRy FoRm • $10 FoR eaCh Photo
• owner Look-a-Like
• Best Looking
Pet’s Name: _________________________________________
Owner’s Name: ______________________________________
Submitted By: _______________________________________
address: ___________________________________________
Email: _______________________ Phone: _______________
• most adorable
• most Comical
Enter any pet you have and you could win a prize!
THANK YOU
I would like to thank all my sponsors for your generous
donations during the California High School Rodeo Season.
Thank you again for all your support.
I made it to the Nationals!!
With thanks and gratitude,
Torrie Johnston
Wye Road Feed & •
Supply
Manor Market •
Sheriff Bill Lutze •
Ray’s Appliance •
Repair
CUTS
Continued from front page
reallocating staff.”
The board’s decision flies
in the face of wishes
expressed by the public, who
said there have been signifi-
cant cuts in recent years and
recommended that the
Library and Museum maintain
separate staff.
Pastor Erin McPhee said
that she is concerned about
the impact the board’s deci-
sion will have on low-income
residents and visitors to the
area who use the libraries for
work, school and to simply
keep in touch with friends,
family and work while visit-
ing the area.
“The libraries have already
given a significant percent of
their budget the last few
years. There are other areas
for cuts with less impact,”
McPhee said. “Please do not
take more from our libraries.”
Independence resident
Rose Masters, the daughter of
Librarian Nancy Masters and
a longtime library volunteer,
expounded on past cuts to
the library, pointing out that
there was a 27 percent reduc-
tion to the library’s expenses
last budget year. She added
that, in an effort to conserve
funds, the library system has
cut its staff by half, maintain-

We don’t have
the luxury of
having specific
jobs with specific
job duties … I was
raised in Tonopah
and I don’t know
if it even has a
library and it
doesn’t make me
less of a person.

– Linda Arcularius,
District 1 Supervisor
Bryce Lyons and Maryann Vega were using the Bishop Branch of the Inyo County Free Library
Wednesday to practice school work. The Inyo County Board of Supervisors this week approved a re-
organization of the Library and Museum Services Department that will have the two agencies sharing
a staff member.
Photo by Thomas Sills
In response to a quote from Thomas Jefferson stating that libraries
play an important role in creating an informed public, and an
informed public being vital to democracy, Second District Supervisor
Jeff Griffiths (above) said, “If closing (the library) on Monday is a
threat to democracy, then 70 percent of counties in America have
already ruined democracy.”
Photo by Charles James
Independence resident Rose
Masters asked the Board of
Supervisors to reconsider its
decision to assign a staff mem-
ber to work in both the Inyo
County Library and Eastern
California Museum. Masters
said the library has already
endured enough cuts and done
its share to balance the county
budget.
Photo by Charles James
ing services in the Bishop
branch with part-time, tempo-
rary employees.
“Any further cuts to the
library would be ludicrous,
and also harmful,” Masters
said, adding that it would
also be an “act of censorship”
of the people. “The library
has already done its share to
balance the budget.”
Second District Supervisor
Jeff Griffiths – and later
County Administrative
Officer Kevin Carunchio –
responded, saying that the
library budget had been cut
by 7 percent, not 27 percent.
The Inyo County Board of
Supervisors did vote last
August to reduce the library
staff’s salary and benefits
package by 30 percent. All
told, the 2012-13 budget for
the Inyo County Library was
$649,477. The recommended
budget for 2013-14 was
$493,763. That’s a 24 percent
reduction total.
Masters attempted to
respond to the discrepancy in
the numbers, but Third
District Supervisor and Board
Chair Rick Pucci did not allow
it, saying it was not the time
for public comment. Masters
was provided with a second
opportunity to address the
board later in the meeting,
but Pucci asked her not to
start a “debate.”
During her second stint
before the board on Tuesday,
Masters explained that the
issue is not about keeping the
library doors open, but about
keeping enough staff in the
department to run the vari-
ous branches of the Library.
“It’s hard to use volunteers if
you don’t have staff to take
care of them,” Masters said.
Independence resident
Mary Roper, Librarian Nancy
Masters’ sister, asked the
board to table the discussion
and volunteer for a day at the
library to see the kind of
work staff and other volun-
teers do before approving any
changes to the department.
She also asked that the coun-
ty librarian and museum ser-
vices director be given an
opportunity to address the
board.
Those requests were
ignored, but Fourth District
Supervisor Mark Tillemans
and Griffiths did request a
workshop to update the
board on the progress the
county library has made
towards automation, and on
the efforts of the various
Friends of the Library organi-
zations.
First District Supervisor
Linda Arcularius said she is
still in favor of eliminating
one management position
and consolidating the library
and museum departments
under one manager, which
was recommended by
Hennarty and Carunchio last
month.
“This isn’t a value judge-
ment on the library or muse-
um. It’s about what we can
afford,” Arcularius said. “My
district travels 40 miles to go
to the library. Years ago I
chose to close the Rovana
Library. I understand that
they’re important … We’re
not talking about closing the
libraries … We don’t have the
luxury of having specific jobs
with specific job duties … I
was raised in Tonopah and I
don’t know if it even has a
library* and it doesn’t make
me less of a person.”
Pucci said he supports the
libraries, but tough decisions
must be made. “Next week
it’s public safety,” Pucci said,
referring to a workshop
scheduled to discuss the
Public Safety budget. “These
are not value judgements. I’m
committed to libraries. We
have one pot of money basi-
cally. The question is, ‘What
can you do to keep them
alive and viable?’ It’s not
going to be 100 percent pop-
ular … If we can do it better,
let us know.”
Another speaker, Richard
Rynne, said the county can
do better. “Sometimes you’re
expected to do a little more,”
he told the board. Rynne rec-
ommended that the board
look at what other counties
are doing to balance their
budgets and compete with
them to do better. He also
said that government grant
funding could help the librar-
ies, and suggested that a tax
increase may be in order.
Tonopah does have a
library.
www.inyoregister.com
(760) 873-3535
Find what you
need and what
you want in
The Inyo Register
Classifeds!
Find what you
need and what
you want in
The Inyo Register
Classifeds!
6 THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 The Inyo Register
BISHOP SUMMER CAMP MEETING 2014
JULY 23RD THRU JULY 27TH
HOSTED BY PASTOR STAN SUMMERS AT HOUSE OF MERCY CHURCH
MUSIC AND
PREACHING
FROM
THE CRUSADE TEAM
7:00 PM NIGHTLY WED. THRU SAT.
FREE TO PUBLIC / ALL ARE WELCOME
LOCATION: HOUSE OF MERCY CHURCH
393 South PaHa Lane Bishop, CA 93514
PASTOR STAN
SUMMERS
GABRIEL
RODRIGUEZ
ZEMIRAH
ROY CHACON
FERNANDO MILAN
EVANGELIST
MARTY MARTINEZ
JEREMY ESTRADA
DAVID TRENT
THOMAS SLOAN
Daytime Services: Thurs. & Fri. 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.
Sat. Exploring Bible Prophecy: 10 a.m.-noon & 1 p.m.-3 p.m.
Sunday Services: 10 a.m. & 6 p.m.
CREEK
Continued from front page
shop at Tuesday’s Board of
Supervisors meeting with
Lahontan Regional Water
Quality Control Board staff
and other county stakehold-
ers. By the end of the meeting,
Inyo Department of
Environmental Health Director
Marvin Moskowitz recom-
mended his department put
up notices on impacted water-
ways warning potential swim-
mers of a bacterial count that
exceeds both regional and fed-
eral standards.
The Bishop Paiute
Reservation already has a sys-
tem in place based on the
tribal Environmental
Management Office monitor-
ing program with posted
warnings that contaminants
exceed federal standards for
recreational use.
Additional testing will indi-
cate the source of the con-
tamination, to a certain extent.
According to Moskowitz, test-
ing results can identify the
source as human, bovine or
“other.” “Other” could be bea-
vers or the ducks at City Park.
In a phone interview
Wednesday, Bishop City Public
Works Director Dave Grah
was quick to point out that
Lahonton testing was on sur-
face water only. “We heavily
test our drinking water,” he
said. “While we are concerned,
there has probably not been
any real change over the last
100 years. This is not a sud-
den health risk.”
Both E. coli and fecal coli-
form are bacteria found in the
intestines of warm-blooded
animals. Both are indicators of
potential health risks.
Lahontan standards are mea-
sured in fecal coliform levels;
local agencies and the federal
Environmental Protection
Agency test for E. coli, a pro-
cess that is less labor inten-
sive. Federal standards for
water bodies open to recre-
ational uses are set at 126
colonies per 100 ml; Lahontan
regional standards are 20 col-
onies per 100 ml.
According to Lahontan
staff at the board workshop,
regional standards are high
because of the pristine origins
of Eastern Sierra waterways
with the simple logic that it is
easier and cheaper to keep a
waterway clean than it is to
clean up a dirty one.
Discussions of standards
and bacteria testing aside,
Moskowitz said “there is
something going on that
should not be going on. There
are issues that should be
addressed.”
Lahontan conducted tests
in the Owens River watershed
through the summer and fall
of 2012-13. According to
Moskowitz, there were 15
monitoring sites along Bishop
Creek from Mumy Lane to the
canal, with contamination lev-
els ranging from zero to 4,000
during that two-year period.
“The numbers are all over the
place,” he said.
Lahontan Division Manager
Mike Plaziak explained the
implications of a Section
303(d) listing. “Once a water-
way is listed as impaired,” he
said, “it stays on the list until
the impairment is rectified.”
The goal is to return all listed
waterways to their beneficial
uses by 2025.
The only thing keeping
Bishop Creek off the list to
date is the fact that data was
not available when decisions
on additions to the 303(d) list
were made.
Going forward, the process
includes more data collection
and identifying the sources of
the contamination. Once the
culprit or culprit(s) are identi-
fied, there are federal and
other grant funds available for
remediation.
As a self-governing entity,
the Bishop Paiute Reservation
has matched its surface water
standards to the federal stan-
dard. “The drought and heat
have not been to our advan-
tage,” said BryAnna Vaughn of
the tribal EMO. The office
monitors water quality on
both forks of Bishop Creek as
they enter and leave the reser-
vation. According to Vaughn,
the creek’s numbers have been
“good until the last two or
three years,” coinciding with
the most recent drought.
Bacterial levels also fell over
the last three weeks.
Vaughn explained that her
office had checked bacterial
levels above and below cattle
grazing lands with no differ-
ence in those levels. But,
exploration further upstream
indicated the source may
have been beavers, or
“other.”
Going forward, city, county
and tribal stakeholders, as
well as staff from the Los
Angeles Department of Water
and Power’s environmental
department, will continue to
monitor bacterial levels and
work toward identifying the
source.
Legion Auxiliary holds raffle
Big Pine’s American Legion Auxiliary is raffling off this 56-quart Coleman rolling cooler along
with a wide range of supplies perfect for a summer picnic. Join the American Legion Auxiliary
on July 4 at Mendenhall Park, Big Pine during the Big Pine Fire Department’s Fourth of July
activities to win this prize. Raffle tickets are $1 each or $5 for six. All proceeds go to local veteran
activities.
File photo
Residents and
visitors
encouraged to
check out biplane
replica
and exhibits
over holiday
By Jon Klusmire
Special to the Register
The Eastern California
Museum in Independence
will be open all three days of
the July 4 weekend, showcas-
ing a replica biplane, a new
book on local history and a
presentation on an historic
“high” in Inyo County’s avia-
tion history.
The air-conditioned muse-
um will be open its regular
hours, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday,
with the exception of Friday,
when the Museum will not
open until after the famous
Independence Independence
Day Parade, which starts at
10 a.m. and makes two laps
in front of spectators on U.S.
Highway 395 (thus the nick-
name, “The Parade So Nice
They Run It Twice”).
After the parade, visitors
to the air-conditioned muse-
um can get an up-close look
at the amazing replica
biplane that rolled down the
parade route, thanks to the
Friends of the Eastern
California Museum. The rep-
lica biplane is fashioned after
the aircraft flown over the
top of Mt. Whitney by Silas
Christofferson in 1914. His
flight was the inspiration for
this year’s July 4 theme of
“Flying High in
Independence.”
This replica of the biplane
designed by Christofferson
and made to his specifica-
tions by aviation pioneer
Glenn Curtiss was built by
Independence residents Ken
Ebert and Mark Wagner with
assistance from Ruby Garza,
Barbara Leachman, Alan
Smith and Dave Wagner. The
project was conceived by
FECM trustee and local histo-
rian Sharon Avey and com-
pleted with financial support
from the organization.
The replica will be sta-
tioned in the museum park-
ing lot on July 4, so folks can
marvel at the construction
and take photos next to the
plane.
The biplane will remain
on museum grounds through
Saturday. Avey will present a
thorough explanation of
Christofferson’s flight, which
took place only 11 years after
the Wright Brothers’ flight at
Kitty Hawk. Avey’s presenta-
tion will include a large selec-
tion of historic photos, a
lively overview of the flight
and the big commotion it
caused in Inyo County in
1914 and other interesting
facts and observations. The
presentation will begin at 11
a.m. on Saturday in the
museum.
The weekend will actually
get started on Thursday, July
3, when the museum hosts
the opening reception for the
Owens Valley School All
Class Reunion. The alumni
will start to gather at about 5
p.m. on the museum lawn to
enjoy refreshments, register,
reminisce and obtain a sched-
ule for the events being held
over the weekend.
OV grad Art Williams will
be on hand with copies of his
new book, “Reflecting on WW
II, Manzanar, and WRA.”
Williams’ parents were
among the 200 War
Relocation Authority staff
members who worked at
Manzanar. He came to the
camp as a teen and had to
adjust to camp life. His book
looks at life in Manzanar
through the perspective of
the WRA employees and their
families and the day-to-day
efforts to “run” the camp.
The book, “focuses on the
complexities of life within
Eastern California Museum hosts July 4 events
Replica plane builders Ken Ebert (l) and Mark Wagner with their airplane float.
Photo submitted
Manzanar Camp as employ-
ees and internees learned to
work together to build a city,
complete with hospitals,
schools, churches and manu-
facturing plants, out of an
incarceration center.”
Of particular interest to
Owens Valley residents are
the books’ lists of the civilian
employees, military person-
nel and military police who
worked at Manzanar during
the war. The lists contain
names, job titles, whether
the employee lived at camp
or in Independence or Lone
Pine and, in many instanc-
es, personal information
about the employees and
what they did after the
war.
Visitors and residents
enjoying the many activi-
ties on Independence Day
in Independence are invited
to make a tour of the air-
conditioned museum a part
of their day. Besides the
museum’s permanent
exhibits, the featured sum-
mer exhibit is “Building
Bill’s Ditch: The Los Angeles
Aqueduct, 1913 –2013.”
The Eastern California
Museum is located at 155
N. Grant St., three blocks
west of the historic court-
house in Independence, and
is open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
every day. Call the museum
at (760) 878-0258 for more
information, or check the
Museum’s Facebook Page,
or Web page at www.inyo-
county.us/ecmuseum.
The Inyo Register THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 7
Paul Lake, seen here with wife Anne, was recently named the
California League of High Schools’ Educator of the Year.
Photo submitted
Local grad earns
top teaching
award
Paul Lake, Bishop born
and bred, recognized
for educational excellence
Special to The Inyo Register
Bishop native Paul Lake was named “California League of
High Schools Educator of the Year,” at the League’s annual con-
ference in Sacramento on March 1. The California League of
Schools is a statewide non-profit educator’s association dedi-
cated to helping K-12 educators improve student learning
through useful, evidence-based professional development and
other resources.
The Educator of the Year award is given to teachers who
exemplify educational excellence and have made significant
efforts to implement elements of educational reform in high
schools.
Lake posted the following on his Facebook page the morning
he received the award: “A unique set of circumstances led me to
be named the California League of High Schools Educator of the
Year for 2014. Thank you to all who have made this possible for
me, especially Anne Latimer Lake, who truly does ‘support a
career that is more demanding than it is lucrative,’ as well as my
parents, Donna and Gary Lake, who were both excellent public
school teachers and a great example for me to follow.”
Lake has been teaching science for 26 years, and at Buchanan
High School in Clovis, since its inception in 1991. Buchanan
Principal Ricci Ulrich describes Lake as: “Humorous, caring and
intellectual … He just makes the whole business fun – for his
kids, for his principal, for his parents, for everybody.” Lake says,
“My vocation is my avocation … I like the interaction with stu-
dents … Even after teaching physics for 21 years – I’m not bored
with it – you just can’t wait for others to see what you see.”
Lake is primarily a science teacher with an emphasis on phys-
ics and associated math, and is part of Buchanan’s environmen-
tal studies, called the “Energy Academy.” Additionally, for 10
years, he has been the teacher-advisor for the “Buchanan Bird
Brains,” the school’s robotics team that competes in regional
and national competitions.
Lake was born in Bishop in 1962, attended the Bishop ele-
mentary schools, graduated from the 8th grade at Round Valley
School following a family move from Short Street to Mustang
Mesa in 1972. Lake graduated from Bishop Union High School
in 1980, where he was student body president that year. He
went on to graduate from Cal-Poly San Luis Obispo, where he
met his future wife, Anne. The couple and their three children
live within walking distance of California State University,
Fresno.
Aaron Lamb and Daniel Klemencic (r) of
Bishop Union High School accept their
scholarships from Caltrans.
Photo submitted
Brooke Ross of Owens Valley High School
in Independence was one of four gradu-
ates to receive a scholarship from Caltrans
District 9.
Photo submitted
Caltrans representative Florene Trainor
presents Chad Cracraft of Sherman E.
Burroughs High School with a District 9
scholarship.
Photo submitted
District 9 awards
scholarships
to area seniors
Register Staff
Caltrans employees in Inyo, Mono and
Kern counties who participated in various
fundraisers this past year were able to
award $4,000 in scholarships to area high
school seniors.
According to Caltrans Public
Information Officer Florene Trainor, the
Caltrans District 9 Scholarship Committee
awarded four, $1,000 scholarships to
students in Bishop, Independence and
Ridgecrest.
In addition to the money raised by
Caltrans employees, the California
Transportation Commission added an
additional 25 percent to each scholar-
ship.
Recipients of the scholarships are:
Bishop Union High School
Aaron Lamb
Daniel Klemencic
Owens Valley High School
Brooke Ross
Sherman E. Burroughs
High School
Chad Cracraft
According to Trainor, employees of
District 9 formed the Scholarship
Committee in 2001, which makes 13 con-
secutive years awarding local scholar-
ships to area students seeking a college
degree or attending trade school in a
transportation related field.
“These scholarships are made possible
by the overwhelming support and gener-
osity of all District 9 employees,” she
said. “Caltrans District 9 would like to
congratulate all of the graduating seniors
and wish them much success in their
future.”
Caltrans workers help grads
Representing
with pride
Lone Pine Fire Department Cadet Jacob Waldt (r) was one of
several local students participating in the American Legion’s
Boys State program in Sacramento last week. While at the
California Firefighters’ Memorial in Capitol Park, he met a
fellow Inyo County student also paying his respects: Big Pine
Fire Department Cadet Ramon Ellerman-Clark. The two
posed for this photo which Waldt sent to his mom, Sheyanne
Joiner. Naturally, she was proud. “Good job, boys,” Joiner
said.
Photo submitted
Bishop location
adds coffee,
pastries and
weekly drawings
Register Staff
In its 20th year, the Eastern
Sierra Certified Farmers’
Market continues to offer two
market locations and is intro-
ducing some new features.
The Bishop Farmers’ Market
is open Saturday mornings,
9-11 a.m., from June through
October and is located west of
U.S. Highway 395 on Church
Street, directly behind City
Hall. Skip’s Outdoor Market in
Mammoth Lakes, which hon-
ors the late Skip Harvey, one-
time mayor of Mammoth
Lakes, is open Wednesday eve-
nings, 4-7 p.m., from July
through August and is located
on State Route 203 at the
Mammoth Luxury Outlet Mall.
“There are many return
farmers and vendors to both
Markets as well as some new
additions,” a spokesperson
said.
Seasonal items to be offered
include apricots, peaches, nec-
tarines, berries, carrots, kale,
beets, chard, lettuce, radishes,
kohlrabi, cabbage, garlic,
onions, leeks, broccoli,
Japanese summer turnips, lav-
ender, chicken eggs, flowers
and herbs. As the season pro-
gresses, tomatoes, potatoes,
zucchini, eggplant, peppers,
corn, apples, melons, duck
eggs and more will be added
to the markets offerings.
New elements for the
Bishop Farmers’ Market
include a coffee and pastries
booth, chair massage, weekly
customer survey and drawing
for a basket of produce and
other goodies donated by the
farmers and others in appre-
ciation of the community’s
support.
“ESCFM is always looking
for new farmers/gardeners,
complimentary vendors, and
entertainment to join adjacent
to the weekly markets and for
suggestions from the commu-
nity,” the spokesperson said.
For the Bishop location,
contact Sue at (760) 937-6768
or by email at bishopfarmers-
market@gmail.com. For the
Mammoth location, contact
Cleland at (760) 914-2000 or
by email at cleland@mam-
mothluxuryoutlets.com.
Farmers’ markets
offer old favorites
and new additions
Get it in
The Inyo
Register
Classifeds.
Get it in
The Inyo
Register
Classifeds.
www.inyoregister.com
8 THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 The Inyo Register
TV THURS./FRI. FOR
Owned and Run By Animal Lovers!!
1260 N. Main Street on Hwy. 6 in Bishop
760-872-8010
Wye Road
Feed & Supply
Open 7 Days a Week
The following is a compilation of
information taken from the daily activi-
ties logs at the Bishop Police Department
and the Bishop and Lone Pine Inyo
County Sheriff’s departments. Since
most cases have yet to be adjudicated,
all charges should be considered allega-
tions.
Logs from the Bishop Police
Department were not avail-
able at press time. –Ed.
June 17
11:26 a.m. – Lone Pine resi-
dent advises Sheriff’s Depart-
ment that a subject who has
a restraining order against
resident is parked outside and
resident wants to leave. Resi-
dent does not want subject to
be able to say resident tried to
make contact. No restraining
order found on fle. Options
explained.
June 18
10:18 p.m. – Keeler resident
complains to Sheriff’s Depart-
ment that military aircraft are
doing maneuvers over Keeler
and military people are driv-
ing around and through the
town being rude to people.
10:26 p.m. – Sheriff’s De-
partment receives report of
a subject causing problems.
Waylon Butterbredt is arrest-
ed on two active Inyo County
warrants.
June 19
11:24 a.m. – Resident ad-
vises Sheriff’s Department of
getting into a fght with their
father. Resident is advised of
options.
7:33 p.m. – Deputy contacts
Salvador Arias and arrests him
for alleged public intoxication.
Arias is transported to Inyo
County Jail for booking.
June 20
11:05 a.m. – Sheriff’s De-
partment receives report of a
disturbance at Whitney Por-
tal Campground. Subject was
asked to leave and did so.
Subject returned and is now
dumping trash at the camp-
site. Deputy speaks with camp-
ground host, who had a verbal
altercation with the subject.
Subject is gone on deputy’s
arrival. Subject is located at
Independence gas station and
advised not to return to camp-
ground.
4:56 p.m. – Sheriff’s Depart-
ment receives report that a
brown pickup truck, unknown
make/model, dropped a baby
carriage and large folding dog
pen in the middle of the high-
way at gas station at south end
of town. Items are at gas sta-
tion. Items returned to owner.
June 21
2:58 p.m. – Deputy con-
ducts traffc stop that results
in subject being cited for pos-
session of illegal freworks
near Shoshone.
7:11 p.m. – Deputies are
dispatched to residence in Big
Pine for report of a loud party/
loud music and possible drugs
and drinking. Occupants are
warned and advised about the
noise.
10:51 p.m. – Deputies are
dispatched to residence in
Bishop for report of a loud
party/people yelling. Owner of
residence is contacted. Subject
is warned and advised and will
comply.
June 22
2:36 p.m. – Bishop resident
requests deputy after a sub-
ject drives by and yells hostile
profanities out of a car win-
dow. Resident wants to notify
law enforcement. Options ex-
plained.
8:55 p.m. – Bishop resident
advises Sheriff’s Department
they would like to speak to
someone about the neighbors.
9:10 p.m. – Sheriff’s Depart-
ment is advised that people
who requested a tow are pos-
sibly under the infuence of
drugs. Deputy contacts sub-
jects, who admit to being rude
over the phone when request-
ing the tow. Subjects’ vehicle’s
engine seized on State Route
136 earlier that day. Subjects
said they would stay the night
in a motel and contact a differ-
ent tow company in the morn-
ing. All is OK for now.
June 23
8:46 a.m. – Bishop resident
advises Sheriff’s Department
of being the target of a scam.
Subject calling resident states
he is from the IRS and she owes
back taxes. If she doesn’t give
him money, she will be arrest-
ed. Deputy speaks to resident,
who says a male had called her
approximately six times in the
last four days telling her he was
from the Department of Se-
curity from the U.S. Treasury.
This male told the resident she
needed to pay back taxes (no
amount given) or someone was
going to be at her house to ar-
rest her and hold her without
bail. No money was given.
8:28 p.m. – Sheriff’s De-
partment receives report of
two hikers overdue from Mt.
Whitney. Deputy contacts the
two hikers at their campsite
in Mt. Whitney Campground.
They advise the remaining two
hikers were following behind
them and should arrive at the
trailhead soon. Hikers later
contact dispatch and advise all
four of their party were at the
trailhead and safe.
June 24
9:23 a.m. – Sheriff’s De-
partment is notifed of a SPOT
activation at Little Whitney
Meadow. Subject was bucked
off his mule and has suffered
broken ribs. Subject is contact-
ed and airlifted to Southern
Inyo Hospital by CHP H80 for
treatment. Information report
taken.
9:42 a.m. – Sheriff’s Depart-
ment takes report of domestic
battery in Stovepipe Wells.
Incident occurred last night.
Death Valley National Park
Service rangers arrested one
of the subjects for disorderly
conduct, vandalism and pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance. Deputy takes a battery
report against subject.
12:22 p.m. – Search and
Rescue is called out to Wheeler
Ridge where a grandfather and
grandson have gotten their
truck stuck and the grand-
father is sick. Grandfather is
fown to Bishop Airport and
transported to Northern Inyo
Hospital. Report taken.
June 25
1:27 a.m. – Subject advises
Sheriff’s Department his wife
and three others are overdue
from Mt. Whitney. Subject
would like deputy to check for
vehicle at trailhead. Deputy
makes contact with four sub-
jects.
9:09 a.m. – Sheriff’s Depart-
ment receives report of a lawn
mower on fre in backyard
of Bishop home; no brush or
structures threatened. Fire de-
partment handles.
12:57 p.m. – Independence
resident tells Sheriff’s Depart-
ment unknown subject(s) at-
tempted to steal his motor-
cycle; key is broken off in the
ignition. Key did not belong to
him and he was able to remove
it.
1:26 p.m. – Bishop resident
advises Sheriff’s Department
he found a knife and fashlight
in his yard. Report taken.
6:52 p.m. – Sheriff’s Depart-
ment receives report of a sus-
picious subject sitting on the
front bench at the park in Lone
Pine watching children; ap-
pears to be homeless. Deputy
makes contact with subject.
10:52 p.m. – Woman calls
Sheriff’s Department advising
her son did not return home
from the north fork of Baris
Creek with his hiking partner
and she would like to talk to
someone. Deputy makes con-
tact.
BADGE BYLINE
The Inyo Register THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 9
Previous Puzzle Solved
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
KATHY & MARCY
HOLIDAY MATHIS
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
HOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY
Dear Annie: I am a
76-year-old man. After 46
years of a happy marriage,
my precious wife passed
away four years ago.
I live in the country and
have become acquainted with
several single women around
my age who are widows or
divorcees and live within a
20-mile radius. I have taken a
few of them out to dinner or
to a play. They go with me
once or twice and won’t go
again. They tell me they are
too busy with their grand-
children. One said, “We are
too different.” Another said
she is not in the dating mood.
All have told me that I am a
real nice guy, and it’s not
because of anything I did or
said.
I’ve never made inappro-
priate advances toward these
women. I’ve only asked for a
little hug because I miss
holding my wife. But it seems
they do not want to be
touched, and two of them
told me that I am expecting
too much. I have never indi-
cated that I wanted more
than a hug, although I have
to admit, in my own mind, I
have hoped that after going
out a few times, we could go
a little farther than that. I’m
not looking for a serious rela-
tionship. I am just extremely
lonesome and would like to
have a companion to go plac-
es with and be together occa-
sionally.
I’ve never really under-
stood women, so I’m at a loss
here. I don’t own a computer,
so I cannot try meeting
women online. Do you have
any suggestions? Please tell
me what I’m doing wrong.
– Lonesome Okie
Dear Lonesome: We don’t
know what you are doing
wrong. If you are giving these
women the impression that
you want physical affection,
but not a serious relation-
ship, they may not be inter-
ested. Asking for hugs on a
first date may be too for-
ward, or it may frighten
them. We know you are lone-
ly, but please slow down.
You might be coming across
as too needy, which is not
attractive. Get to know these
women as friends first, and
see where it leads. And if you
are interested in online dat-
ing, your local library can
provide a computer.
Dear Annie: My brother’s
daughter is getting married
this summer. She’s having a
huge wedding. All of the
nieces, nephews and cousins
are invited except our three
daughters. My brother said
they have to cut somewhere.
Should I just shrug this
off? I told my mother that
I’m so upset, I’m thinking of
never seeing or speaking to
my brother again. Is this a
feeling I should be having?
Should I ask my brother what
we did to them that they
would exclude us in this
way?
– Not a Happy Sister
Dear Sister: Generally, it
is wise to “cut” along the
same family lines, so that,
for example, you invite all
first cousins or none of them.
However, sometimes the
bride or groom has a close
relationship with some cous-
ins and not others. In such
cases, if the guest list is lim-
ited, it makes sense to invite
those with whom you are
closest. Is it possible that
your children are especially
distant from the bride? Have
they had a falling out of
which you are unaware?
Unless there is a reason, we
find this exclusion unneces-
sarily hurtful. We hope you
can work through it.
Dear Annie: “Disgusted in
N.Y.” said her 85-year-old
aunt never had a bath in the
six weeks she spent in the
hospital. There is evidence
not to bathe hospital patients
using plastic tubs due to
increased infection rates
when tubs are not disinfect-
ed sufficiently between uses.
As a result, many hospi-
tals have adopted the use of
prepackaged disposable bath
wipes. Often these are
warmed and feel good to the
patient, and it cleans them.
Perhaps the hospital needs
to investigate using these
wipes.
– Pennsylvania Nurse
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL
60611. To find out more
about Annie’s Mailbox, and
read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
at www.creators.com.
Lonesome widower having a difficult time dating
These days, “trigger warnings” are
used to alert sensitive souls to poten-
tially depressing or unsettling media
content. Some appreciate the heads
up, and others suggest it indicates a
dumbing down of society. The sensi-
ble Virgo moon encourages keen
awareness and a strong inner guid-
ance that will render such labels
unnecessary.
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Your charming presentation comes
from an intuition you have about the
people you’re among. You want to
delight them. You know something
good will develop out of the connec-
tion you make.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
You’ll be walking an ethical line as to
how much to participate in gossip.
Even just hearing it might be too
much. Anyway, there won’t be a short-
age of juicy stories today, most served
up with a side of Schadenfreude.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
You normally don’t worry yourself
about what others think of you, but in
today’s situation, a stellar impression
will make the difference between win-
ning and losing. Ask for feedback.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). You
don’t want to be mildly happy with
your work; you want to be enthusias-
tic about it. Therefore, adjustments will
be made. What is it that’s keeping you
from the higher levels of joy?
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
Implement yesterday’s plans, and
you’ll bump up your productivity con-
siderably. Still, at the end of the day, it
will be about how much you loved,
not how much you did.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Boasting, posturing, name-dropping
and the like usually turn you off – but
not today. You’ll be pulled in. Maybe
it’s because you’re flattered that peo-
ple feel they need to work so hard to
impress you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Like
a seasoned jazz artist or comedian,
you’ll do your best work when you’re
riffing. You’ll play around in a loose
mix of random thoughts and wind up
with some brilliant order.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
You’re wary of those who wear their
trendy pet causes like the latest
designer shoes, though you’re quite
interested in the person with an
unusual and very personal quest.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). If your actions reflect reality and
not the idealized self-image you want
them to reflect, you can count yourself
among the multitudes. Dealing in real-
ity is the only way to get closer to the
person you want to be.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
The pressure is definitely on, but it will
only last for a moment. Then, win or
lose, it will be over, and you’ll be free
to recharge so you can try again
tomorrow.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
You understand that not everyone
shares your moral code, but what
worries you is the way it’s so casually
bent and broken by people who claim
to uphold it. Forget the words; pay
attention to people’s deeds today.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
Because you really know and cater to
your audience, your way of expressing
your ideas will be appealing and effec-
tive. You’ll be lucky as you help those
who are new to the process and
therefore clueless.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (July 3).
So attractive, you will be cherished
and pursued throughout the year.
Enjoying extreme talent will aggravate
something in you: a desire to pursue
your own talents with more zeal. Next
month your soaring ambitions will be
matched only by your ability to realize
them. September and November are
the most lucrative. Libra and Scorpio
people adore you. Your lucky num-
bers are: 50, 2, 25, 41 and 16.
WEEKEND LOVE FORECAST:
ARIES: Mild jealousy is flattering.
Overt jealousy is difficult to deal with
and should be nipped in the bud.
TAURUS: Gossiping is how insecure
people try to weed out the competi-
tion. You’ll see it for what it is and
want no part of it. GEMINI: Striking
up the right conversational topic will
turn a lukewarm connection into a hot
one. CANCER: You’ll be promised
much, and if the person does even
one thing he or she promises, you
stand to gain greatly. LEO: Save the
items that might later help you recall
happy days and the people you love.
VIRGO: Don’t let loved one’s limit
you. Call out their behavior to prevent
a pattern of subtle restriction. LIBRA:
Changing your appearance will alter
the dynamic of a relationship.
SCORPIO: You want to learn more
about a certain someone, but not so
much that things become predictable.
SAGITTARIUS: What’s done in love
is a creative act. CAPRICORN:
Someone is falling in love with your
inner approach to life. AQUARIUS:
You might disagree with a loved one
on the little things, but the big things
are what matter for now. PISCES:
Collaborations will work brilliantly, so
jump in and play.
COUPLE OF THE WEEKEND:
The Libra moon of partnership reflects
the nurturing Cancer sun, sparking an
interest between these two signs.
Libra is so diplomatic and easy to get
along with that Cancer hardly needs to
engage in the usual protective antics
that make the crab feel safe. Cancer’s
aesthetic sensibility is right in line with
Libra’s, which makes it easy to decide
on a mutually delightful plan of
action.
To find out more about Holiday
Mathis and read her past columns,
visit the Creators Syndicate Web page
at www.creators.com.
Private businesses or groups hold-
ing events for profit are not eligible
to use this section. Due to space limi-
tations, we can only guarantee one
run per item. All submissions are
subject to editing.
Thursday, July 3
ART FOR CONSERVATION
Join Eastern Sierra Land Trust for the
Grand Opening Reception of its sixth
annual Art for Conservation Show and
Sale, taking place from 5-7 p.m. at
Mono Council for the Arts Gallery in
Mammoth Lakes. The show’s stunning
original artwork captures the Eastern
Sierra’s most treasured vistas: from the
towering Sierra Crest to the winding
Owens River, and everything in between.
Admission is free and open to the pub-
lic, and proceeds will benefit ESLT’s
work to preserve the Eastside’s vital wild
and working lands. For more informa-
tion, visit www.eslt.org.
PRE-FOURTH PARTY
Join the community of Independence
for a pre-Fourth party featuring music
and dancing at Dehy Park from 8 p.m.-
midnight.
Friday, July 4
5/10K RUN RUN IN BIG PINE
The Big Pine Volunteer Fire
Department is holding its annual, fund-
raising 5/10K Fun Run, beginning at
7:30 a.m. at the Big Pine Fire Station.
The run will end at Mendenhall Park,
where an all-you-can-eat breakfast is
being served until 10:30 a.m. The $25
entry fee covers the cost of breakfast. A
limited supply of T-shirts may be avail-
able on race day for those who signed
up after June 19. The 10K is for the most
part an off-road trail run. The 5K is a
road run event. For more information or
to register, contact Rich Coffman at
(760) 937-1146.
AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY RAFFLE
The Big Pine American Legion
Auxiliary will be holding a Picnic Ice
Chest Raffle during the Big Pine Fire
Department’s Fourth of July activities.
The 56 quart Coleman rolling cooler will
contains all items required for a super
picnic. Items included are: a Smart and
Final $25 gift card, sun tea container,
barbecue sauce, popcorn, peanuts, first
aid kit, case of bottled water, serving tray
and utensils, tee-shirts, crackers, chips,
condiments, plates, cups, and much
more. Tickets for the raffle are $1 each
or $5 for six tickets, look for the American
Legion tent at the park. All proceeds ben-
efit our local veteran’s activities.
CHILI COOK-OFF, SALSA CONTEST
The Big Pine Volunteer Fire Department
is holding a Fire in the Valley Chili Cook-off
and Salsa Contest from 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
at Mendenhall Park. All proceeds from this
fun event will benefit the fire department.
For more information, contact Rich
Coffman at (760) 937-1146.
JULY 4 IN INDEPENDENCE
Fourth of July festivities in
Independence get started at 6:15 a.m.
with a flag-raising and continue from 6:30-
9 a.m. with a pancake breakfast at Dehy
Park. Events also include a historic walking
tour of Independence at 8:30 a.m. and
the popular 4K-4 Mile Walk/Run at 7:30
a.m. (registration starts at 6:30 a.m.). An
arts and crafts show begins at 8 a.m. on
the Courthouse Lawn. The famous parade
starts at 10 a.m. on U.S. Highway 395 and
will be followed by the equally famous pie
social at Dehy Park at noon. A spelling bee
will be held at 12:30 p.m., followed by Old
Tyme Kids Games at 2. The annual deep-
pit barbecue will be held at Dehy Park
from 4-6:30 p.m. and the grand finale –
fireworks at the Independence Airport –
begin at dusk. Parade entry forms are
available at Independence and Lone Pine
businesses, or at www.inyocounty.info.
JULY 4 IN BISHOP
The City of Bishop is hosting its annual
Big Day at the Park, with festivities begin-
ning at 9 a.m. with a one-pitch softball
tournament and open play tennis, bocce
and sand volleyball. At 11 a.m., the pool
opens to free public swim until 4. At 2,
there will be live music, and also free
watermelon, ice cream and pie, sponsored
by Vons. Festivities come to an end at 4,
when everyone is encouraged to head out
to the Bishop Airport where the Bishop
Volunteer Fire Department will be hosting
its annual fireworks show.
FOURTH OF JULY FARMERS MARKET
Due to the Fourth of July, the next
Owens Valley Growers Cooperative
Farmers Market will be at the Independence
Court House, concurrent with Fourth of
July activities, from 8 a.m.-noon. This
Friday’s market will feature tomatoes,
squash, greens, beets, carrots, garlic, leeks,
onions, herbs, seasonal fruit, eggs, baked
goods, lavender and art. The Lone Pine
Market will be cancelled, and will resume
on July 18 at the IOU Garden following the
regularly scheduled July 11 Independence
Market. For more information, call (760)
915-0185.
Saturday, July 5
BISHOP FARMERS’ MARKET
The Eastern Sierra Certified Farmers’
Market is open 9-11 a.m. west of U.S.
Highway 395 on Church Street, directly
behind City Hall. Seasonal items to be
offered are apricots, peaches, nectarines,
berries, carrots, kale, beets, chard, lettuce,
radishes, kohlrabi, cabbage, garlic, onions,
leeks, broccoli, Japanese summer turnips,
lavender, chicken eggs, flowers, herbs, etc.
As the season progresses, tomatoes, pota-
toes, zucchini, eggplant, peppers, corn,
apples, melons, duck eggs and more will
be added to the markets offerings. There
will also be a coffee and pastries booth
and weekly drawing. For more informa-
tion, contact Sue at (760) at 937-6768 or
by email at bishopfarmersmarket@gmail.
com.
FREEDOM OF WILDERNESS HIKE
Join Friends of the Inyo on a hike to
beautiful Glass Creek Meadow in the
newly designated Owens River Headwaters
Wilderness, a hike with a 2,500-foot of
elevation gain over eight miles. Car shuttle
provided; return time before 4 p.m. RSVP
required as attendance limited to 12 par-
ticipants. More details are available at
friendsoftheinyo.org or by calling (760)
873-6500.
WILDERNESS ACT CELEBRATION
Friends of the Inyo will partner with
the Sierra Club and the Wilderness Society
to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the
passage of the Wilderness Act. Join
them from noon-6 p.m. at Mammoth
Creek Park at Mammoth Lakes. There
will be music, creek exploration, dem-
onstrations and guided walks on the
Mammoth Greenway System. More
details are available at friendsofthei-
nyo.org or by calling (760) 873-6500.
HAZARDOUS WASTE DUMPING
A Household Hazardous Waste
Collection Event will be held from
9 a.m.-noon at the Bishop
Sunland Landfill. Fees for disposal
of household hazardous waste
during the event are waived.
Regular charges apply for all other
disposal. Note that hazardous
waste containers cannot exceed
five gallons each and are limited
to a total of 20 gallons of product
per household. For more informa-
tion, contact Inyo County
Integrated Waste Management at
(760) 873-5577.
Monday, July 7
COMMUNITY BAND
The Bishop Community Band will
perform its weekly free concert from
8-9 p.m. at the band stand at the front
of Bishop City Park. Bring a blanket or
chair and settle in for quality family
entertainment.
10 THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 The Inyo Register
As we celebrate the Fourth of July with barbecues, fireworks
and revelry, it’s important to remember the true meaning of this
important holiday. On the birthday of our nation, we celebrate
freedom and democracy while saluting the heroic efforts of
those who have fought for and defended our liberty since July 4,
1776. We’re proud of our country, our people, our history and
our standing as a symbol of hope, freedom and democracy to
people around the world. Happy birthday, America, and may you
continue to prosper and stand strong through future challenges,
as you have so many times in the past year.
Remember to proudly display your American flag on July 4.
The Emblem of
the Land We Love
This important message is brought to you by these proud sponsors:
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california 93514
(760) 873-4266
CA LIC. #FD-192
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IN BISHOP
IT’S A WHOLE NEW WORLD OF JEWELRY
COME DISCOVER:
Daily flash sales full of beautiful and on-trend accessories
Emerging and renowned designers
A whole new and engaging shopping experience
BECKYANNA.KITSYLANE.COM
A Kitsy Lane Boutique
760-938-2058
BeckyAnna
Enjoy
Recreation
on
LADWP
Land
For more information visit www.laaqueduct.com or write
LADWP 300 Mandich Street, Bishop, CA 93514
Joe and Caryn
Todd
263 S. Main St.
Bishop, CA
760-873-5078
AlpineSigns.com
Sierra Street & Fair Drive
P.O. Box 698 • Bishop, CA 93514
(760) 873-3588 • Fax (760) 873-8874
www.tricountyfair.com
150 Pioneer Lane • Bishop, CA 93514
We’re here for you 24-7
760- 873-5811 • www.nih.org
Rite-Way Pool & Spa
Larry & Audrey
Thornburg
760.873.7727
137 E. Line St.
Bishop, CA 93514
riteway487@gmail.com
Check us out on Facebook!
Inyo County Sheriff’s
Department
550 S. Clay St.
Independence, CA
(760) 878-0383
GLACIER LODGE
760-938-2837
760-920-0492
FOR INFO &
RESERVATIONS
www.jewelofthesierra.com
glacierlodge395@aol.com
Gift Certifcates Available
Studio
27
salon • boutique
156 E. Pine St.
(760) 873-8278
Walk-ins Welcome
Paiute Gas Station
Friendly Service • Fishing Supplies • Snacks
Propane • Hot & Cold Drinks
2750 N. Sierra Hwy. • (760) 872-1224
The Inyo Register
1180 N. Main Street, Ste. 108
Bishop, CA 93514
PH: (760) 873-3535 | FAX: (760) 873-3591
www.inyoregister.com
SERVING THE EASTERN SIERRA
AND BEYOND SINCE 1870
Hundreds of residents and visitors choose to light off their Safe and Sane fireworks at the Bishop
Airport on July 4, knowing the runways provide plenty of asphalt and firefighters are nearby.
Photo by Mike Gervais
Authorities ask
public to be extra
careful with
fireworks,
designate
sober drivers
Register Staff
Both the Inyo and Mono
sheriff’s departments are
wishing residents a happy –
and safe – Fourth of July.
Revelers in both counties
are being reminded that “Safe
and Sane” fireworks are the
only legal fireworks in
California, and can only be
set off in certain, designated
areas. The latter reminder is
especially important, accord-
ing to both local sheriffs,
given the ongoing drought
and dangerously dry condi-
tions.
Public lands, including
Bureau of Land Management
and U.S. Forest Service land,
are off limits when it comes
to discharging fireworks, as
is any land owned by the Los
Angeles Department of Water
and Power. According to the
Inyo County Sheriff’s
Department, “fireworks can
only be used on private prop-
erty and not in the roadway.”
The Mono County Sheriff’s
Department has vowed to
issue tickets and/or confis-
cate fireworks being used
outside of the designated
areas.
Even those who do plan to
light off Safe and Sane fire-
works in legal areas are being
urged to use extreme cau-
tion.
“If you are using fireworks
of any kind in a designated
area, please remember to
read and follow all instruc-
tions, have water and a fire
extinguisher readily available
and always supervise chil-
dren,” a Mono County press
release states.
People lighting campfires
or barbecuing have been sim-
ilarly cautioned.
“Please remember with
the extremely dry conditions,
to use extreme caution with
your campfires and grills.
Only light fires and grills in
designated areas, never leave
a fire or grill burning unat-
tended and always have
plenty of water and a fire
extinguisher available,” Mono
County’s press release states.
“Please take notice to any
restrictions that are in place
due to the extreme condi-
tions.”
In Inyo County, authori-
ties are taking no chances
with the threat of fire from
fireworks or barbecues on
side roads and out in the
boonies.
Historically people have
been allowed to park in unde-
veloped locations around
Bishop to view the fireworks
display at the Bishop Airport.
These viewing parties some-
times entail barbecuing and
lighting of fireworks.
According to an Inyo
County press release, this has
See SAFETY E Page 11
Safety urged this
Fourth of July
Bishop resident Wayde Millender takes some time out from light-
ing fireworks at the Bishop Airport to play a bean-bag toss game
with friends and family last July 4.
Photo by Mike Gervais
Kobe Leigh holds a couple of sparklers on private property, under
close adult supervision with a bucket of water nearby during July
4 festivities in 2013.
Photo by Darcy Ellis
The Inyo Register THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 11
Independence Day is a
time to celebrate our
freedom, but remember,
one thing you’re not free
to do is drink and drive.
Drunk driving jeopardizes
your freedom, your life
and the lives of others.
This holiday weekend,
celebrate responsibly
and encourage your
friends and family
members to do the same.
Drunk
Driving Can
Break Up A
Good Time
Enjoy
Recreation
on
LADWP
Land
For more information visit www.laaqueduct.com or write
LADWP 300 Mandich Street, Bishop, CA 93514
Inyo County Sheriff’s
Department
550 S. Clay St.
Independence, CA
(760) 878-0383
GLACIER LODGE
760-938-2837
760-920-0492
FOR INFO &
RESERVATIONS
www.jewelofthesierra.com
glacierlodge395@aol.com
Gift Certifcates Available
Studio
27
salon • boutique
156 E. Pine St.
(760) 873-8278
Walk-ins Welcome
Rite-Way Pool & Spa
Larry & Audrey
Thornburg
760.873.7727
137 E. Line St.
Bishop, CA 93514
riteway487@gmail.com
Check us out on Facebook!
Joe and Caryn
Todd
263 S. Main St.
Bishop, CA
760-873-5078
AlpineSigns.com
Sierra Street & Fair Drive
P.O. Box 698 • Bishop, CA 93514
(760) 873-3588 • Fax (760) 873-8874
www.tricountyfair.com
Paiute Gas Station
Friendly Service • Fishing Supplies • Snacks
Propane • Hot & Cold Drinks
2750 N. Sierra Hwy. • (760) 872-1224
This important message is brought to you
by these proud sponsors:
SAFETY
Continued from page 10
contributed to safety con-
cerns for the environment,
the community of Bishop and
the many volunteers and pro-
fessionals who fight fires.
As a result, several road
closures will be implemented
on July 4. The road closure
plan was developed by the
Sheriff’s Department, LADWP,
California Highway Patrol,
Inyo County Road Department,
Bishop Police Department
and Bishop Volunteer Fire
Department.
“As many of you know,
California is experiencing a
severe drought,” said Sheriff
Bill Lutze. “This multi-agency
effort is intended to improve
the Fourth of July experience
for residents and citizens by
establishing safe areas to
view fireworks without
impeding traffic or delaying
response efforts in case of
fire, ambulance or other
emergencies along county
and city roads.”
Effective on July 4, the fol-
lowing areas of Bishop will
have enforced, temporary no
parking zones:
• East Line Street/Poleta
Road from the Bishop Creek
Canal to one-half mile east of
Airport Road, noon-10 p.m.
• Airport Road from the
intersection of East Line
Street/Poleta Road to one-
quarter mile north, noon-10
p.m.
• Hanby Street from
behind the Bishop City Park
to just north of East Pine
Street: 6 a.m.-10 p.m.
• Wye Road east from
Spruce Street to the west gate
of the Bishop Airport, noon-
10 p.m.
• East Yaney Street from
Spruce to Hanby streets, 6
a.m.-10 p.m.
There will be LADWP
enforced road closures from
noon July 4 to noon July 5 in
the following locations:
• Bishop Creek Canal from
Williams Waste to Line Street
• South Fork Bishop
Creek/Rawson Creek from
Bishop Creek Canal to Poleta
Road
Of course, vegetation and
structure fires aren’t the only
concerns on the minds of
local authorities.
In addition to the CHP
employing a maximum
enforcement period – mean-
ing every available officer will
be out patrolling area high-
ways – sheriff’s deputies and
police officers will also be on
the look-out for impaired
drivers.
“As you enjoy your cele-
brations and parties, please
remember to have a desig-
nated driver,” the Mono
County press release states.
“Keep the many travelers of
(our) roadways safe – please
do not drink and drive.”
In Inyo County, authorities are
taking no chances with the threat of
fire from fireworks or barbecues on
side roads and out in the boonies.
Bill Lutze,
Inyo County Sheriff
Chris Carter,
Bishop Police Chief
Ralph Obenberger,
Mono County Sheriff
2014 Mary Austin
Writing Contest
Total prize pool is now $1,500
1st Place - $500 • 2nd Place - $400
3rd Place - $300 • 4th Place - $200
5th Place - $100
The 2014 Mary Austin Prize for Writing is of-
fered to students of Inyo and Mono counties who
are entering
the 10th, 11th & 12th grade in the 2014-15
school year.
Rules for the Mary Austin Prize:
• All submissions are limited to
600 words and must be
non-fiction, adhering to the
subject of “outdoor
experience(s) in Inyo and
Mono counties.”
• Entries can detail personal
outdoor, mountain or wilder-
ness adventures or inspiration-
al reflections on your outdoor
journeys – the possibilities are
only limited by the authors’
imaginations.
• Submissions will be accepted
until August 15, 2014.
• Submissions must include
a photo of the author and a
brief
biographical statement to
include for publication.
• Other photos to accompany
the stories, such as scenics or
action shots, are welcome but
will not be judged as part of
the overall submission.
Submit stories in Word, pdf or simple text format to:
Maryaustinaward@gmail.com
Winners and their essays will be announced and printed
in September.
For more information about the 2014
Mary Austin Prize for Writing,
contact Editor Darcy Ellis at (760) 873-3535 ext. 211.
The Inyo Register
For Home Delivery call
873-3535
CLASSIFICATIONS
REAL ESTATE
205 Acreage & Lots
215 Condos For Sale
220 Houses For Sale
225 Income Property
230 Mobile Homes For Sale
235 Real Estate Wanted
RENTALS
150 Aparts. Furnished
155 Aparts. Unfurnished
160 Condos For Rent
170 Houses Unfurnished
175 Mobile Homes For Rent
180 Space For Rent
185 Business Property Rent
190 Rooms For Rent
195 Wanted Fo Rent
200 Vacation Rentals
ANNOUNCEMENTS
003 Happy Ads
010 Personals
015 FREE to You
020 Happiness Is …
025 Lost & Found
030 Upcoming Events
315 Yard Sales
320 Public Notices
325 Holiday Boutiques
ANIMALS
140 Pets
145 Livestock
EMPLOYMENT
035 Business Opportunities
045 Help Wanted
050 Help Wanted
055 Work Wanted
SERVICES
037 Financial Services
038 Guide Services
305 Home Services
310 Professoinal Services
MERCHANDISE
040 Bargain Corral
060 Antiques
065 Appliances
070 Building Supplies
075 Cameras & Access.
080 Computers
085 Firewood
090 Furniture
093 Musical
095 Guns
100 Lawn/Garden
105 Miscellaneous
110 Pools/Spas
125 Tools & Equipment
130 TV/Video
135 Merchandise Wanted
RECREATIONAL
115 Ski Equipment
120 Sporting Goods
240 Boats
245 Jet Skis
250 Campers
255 Motor Homes
260 Travel Trailers
270 Snowmobiles
300 Utility Trailers
TRANSPORTATION
265 Motorcycles
275 Autos
280 Trucks
285 4x4
290 Vans
295 Auto & Truck Parts
12 THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 The Inyo Register
POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
Full-Time Employee Benefts:
NEW POSITIONS
FMedical
FDental/Vision
FVacation
FSick Leave
FPaid Holidays
F401K
P/T IT Assistant
Cocktail Server - On Call
P/T Server
P/T Cook
Dining Room Supervisor
Sous Chef
P/T Facility Technician
Marketing Communication
Coordinator
Applicants must meet requirements to qualify for a Paiute
Palace Gaming License. Applications are available at the
Casino Cashier’s Cage 2742 N. Sierra Hwy., Bishop, CA 93514.
Phone: 760-872-1798 ext. 214 & 220.
Applicants should be aware that the Paiute Palace Casino is not
a smoke free environment.
www.paiutepalace.com
Paiute Palace Casino is an Equal Opportunity Employer
within the confnes of the Indian Preference Act.
Must be 21 or older to work at
The Paiute Palace Casino.
ANSWERS
Puzzle Date:
Tuesday, July 1, 2014
045 HELP WANTED
CHILD CARE CENTER
TEACHER/ DIRECTOR
(Part Time - 2 Openings)
Inyo County Superintendent of
Schools is seeking teachers for
the Big Pine State Preschool &
the Warren Hanson State Pre-
school in Lone Pine for the
2014-15 school year. 4
hours/day Mon-Fri. $13.44 -
$14.88 per hour based on expe-
rience. CA Child Development
Permit required. Site Supervisor
permit preferred. Apply on-line
at www.edjoin.org CONTACT:
760-878-2426.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EM-
PLOYER
INYO COUNTY IS currently accept-
ing applications for the following
positions:
PROGRAMMER-ANALYST IV (Infor-
mation Services)
DEPUTY SHERIFF - CERTIFI-
CATED OR LATERAL (Sheriff's
Office)
CLINIC NURSE MANAGER (Health
& Human Services)
REGISTERED NURSE OR PUBLIC
HEALTH NURSE (Health & Human
Services)
PROGRAM CHIEF - ADULT SERV-
ICES (Health & Human Services)
COURT INFORMATION TECHNOL-
OGY MANAGER (Superior Court of
CA, County of Inyo)
To obtain an application form and
complete job description, contact the
Personnel Office, P.O. Box 249, In-
dependence, CA 93526, (760)
878-0407, or the County of Inyo web-
site: www.inyocounty.us. Must ap-
ply on Inyo County application form.
EOE/ADA.
045 HELP WANTED
COURT INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY MANAGER
SUPERIOR COURT OF
CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF INYO
Location - Bishop and Independ-
ence, CA
Salary- $5503-$6681/mo. (paid over
26 pay periods annually)
Requires a Bachelor's degree in in-
formation technology or computer
science or closely related fields; or
(5) five or more years employment as
a Court Systems Specialist or
equivalent position with proficiency
and experience in an enterprise envi-
ronment of Local and Wide Area Net-
works (LAN/WAN) as well as Virtual
Local Area Networks (VLANs); IBM
iSeries AS/400 server, iSeries Ac-
cess for Windows and Document
Management Services (DMS); Ora-
cle database systems; Cisco Voice
over IP (VoIP) including Cisco Uni-
fied Call Manager (CUCM), Cisco
Unity, Cisco Unified Contact Center
Express (UCCX) and Cisco IP
phones; Cisco security and network
appliances including Routers, Cata-
lyst Multilayer Switches, ASA Fire-
walls including VPN practices and
connectivity and Intrusion Detection
Systems; Cisco Wireless practices
and connectivity including the Cisco
Wireless Control System, Cisco
Wireless Controllers and Cisco Ac-
cess Points; Microsoft Windows
7/Vista/XP NTFS Networking and Mi-
crosoft Office 2010/2007 applications
including Word, Excel, PowerPoint,
Outlook, Access and Visio; Active Di-
rectory (AD), Dynamic Host Control
Protocol (DHCP) and Domain Nam-
ing System (DNS) for Microsoft Win-
dows Server 2008/2003 x64 and x86;
Microsoft Exchange 2007 clustering
and Outlook Web Access (OWA);
Windows Software Update Services
(WSUS); Group Policy Management;
Microsoft Mobile Smartphones in-
cluding Exchange ActiveSync; Inter-
net Information Services (IIS); Sy-
mantec Backup Exec, Symantec An-
tivirus End Point Protection and Sy-
mantec Mail Security appliances; Fi-
ber Optic, ISDN and Cat-5e stan-
dards and connectivity; Traverse File
Transfer Protocol (TFTP), Border
Gateway Protocol (BGP), Enhanced
Interior Gateway Protocol (EIGRP),
Secured Shell (SSH), Secured
Socket Layer (SSL) and Digital Cer-
tificates; APC UPS battery backup
units.
To obtain a complete job description
and an Inyo County application form,
visit www.inyocounty.us or call (760)
878-0407. Deadline for application:
Open until filled-this recruitment
will remain open until position has
been filled. Must apply on Inyo
County application form. EOE/ADA.
The Creekside Inn is now hiring
Front Desk Agents to continue
our tradition of personalized,
attentive service. Consistently
recognized on Trip Advisor by our
guests as “The Best in Bishop with
outstanding staff”, we invite you to
tour our property by visiting our
website at:
www.bishopcreeksideinn.com
Focused on supporti ng our
employee!s personal and profes-
sional growth, we are building a
results oriented team that will
continue to provide unforgettable
service for our guests. Wages
start at $12.00-$14.00 per hour
and include vacation benefits.
Additionally, we offer tremendous
opportunities for growth, cross
property transfers and career
advancement.
Located near National Parks, each
of our boutique hotels reflect the
culture and history of our extraordi-
nary locations: The Wyoming Inn,
Jackson Hole, WY., Olympic
Lodge, Port Angeles, WA., and
The Olympic Inn, Klamath Falls,
OR.
If you are enthusiastic, energetic
and have guest service skills,
please forward your resume to
sean@westerninns.net If your
experience matches our exacting
standards, we will contact you to
schedule a personal interview.
045 HELP WANTED
BISHOP PAIUTE TRIBE is currently
accepting applications for the follow-
ing positions:
FULL TIME
ADMINISTRATION - TRIBAL
ADMINISTRATOR
DOQ
Deadline: Open until filled
CDD–COMMUNITY DEVELOP-
MENT DIRECTOR
$30.90-$43.26/Hr DOQ
Deadline: Open until filled
BPDC-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
DIRECTOR
$35.00-$50.20/Hr DOQ
Deadline: Open until filled
PUBLIC WORKS–PUBLIC WORKS
DIRECTOR
$30.90-$43.26/Hr DOQ
Deadline: Open until filled
ADMINISTRATION-CULTURAL
CENTER COORDINATOR
$19.57-$27.40/Hr DOQ
Deadline: Open until filled
PART-TIME
GAS STATION–CASHIER
$9.27/Hr GRAVEYARD 10PM-6PM
Deadline:7/9/14
EDUCATION–TUTOR
$9.27-$17.30/Hr. DOQ
Deadline:7/18/14
EDUCATION–YOUTH ACTIVITIES
SPECIALIST
$14.42-$20.19/Hr. DOQ
Deadline:7/18/14
Please visit our website or tribal of-
fice for job descriptions and employ-
ment applications. www.bishop-
paiutetribe.com/Careers
Employment applications must be
filled out to be considered for any
positions 50 Tu Su Lane, Bishop, CA
93514. Ph (760) 873-3584 Fax (760)
872-1897
COURT INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY MANAGER
SUPERIOR COURT OF
CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF INYO
Location - Bishop and Independ-
ence, CA
Salary- $5503-$6681/mo. (paid over
26 pay periods annually)
Requires a Bachelor's degree in in-
formation technology or computer
science or closely related fields; or
(5) five or more years employment as
a Court Systems Specialist or
equivalent position with proficiency
and experience in an enterprise envi-
ronment of Local and Wide Area Net-
works (LAN/WAN) as well as Virtual
Local Area Networks (VLANs); IBM
iSeries AS/400 server, iSeries Ac-
cess for Windows and Document
Management Services (DMS); Ora-
cle database systems; Cisco Voice
over IP (VoIP) including Cisco Uni-
fied Call Manager (CUCM), Cisco
Unity, Cisco Unified Contact Center
Express (UCCX) and Cisco IP
phones; Cisco security and network
appliances including Routers, Cata-
lyst Multilayer Switches, ASA Fire-
walls including VPN practices and
connectivity and Intrusion Detection
Systems; Cisco Wireless practices
and connectivity including the Cisco
Wireless Control System, Cisco
Wireless Controllers and Cisco Ac-
cess Points; Microsoft Windows
7/Vista/XP NTFS Networking and Mi-
crosoft Office 2010/2007 applications
including Word, Excel, PowerPoint,
Outlook, Access and Visio; Active Di-
rectory (AD), Dynamic Host Control
Protocol (DHCP) and Domain Nam-
ing System (DNS) for Microsoft Win-
dows Server 2008/2003 x64 and x86;
Microsoft Exchange 2007 clustering
and Outlook Web Access (OWA);
Windows Software Update Services
(WSUS); Group Policy Management;
Microsoft Mobile Smartphones in-
cluding Exchange ActiveSync; Inter-
net Information Services (IIS); Sy-
mantec Backup Exec, Symantec An-
tivirus End Point Protection and Sy-
mantec Mail Security appliances; Fi-
ber Optic, ISDN and Cat-5e stan-
dards and connectivity; Traverse File
Transfer Protocol (TFTP), Border
Gateway Protocol (BGP), Enhanced
Interior Gateway Protocol (EIGRP),
Secured Shell (SSH), Secured
Socket Layer (SSL) and Digital Cer-
tificates; APC UPS battery backup
units.
To obtain a complete job description
and an Inyo County application form,
visit www.inyocounty.us or call (760)
878-0407. Deadline for application:
Open until filled-this recruitment
will remain open until position has
been filled. Must apply on Inyo
County application form. EOE/ADA.
040 BARGAIN CORRAL
SOFA STYLE LIVING room chair.
Rose pattern with matching ottoman
and hardwood side table. All three
for $200. 760-873-7387
VINTAGE COSTUME JEWELRY
from England. 1930!s - 1940!s.
Mainly necklaces & earrings. $100
for ALL. 760-873-8643
COUNTY OF INYO
REGISTERED NURSE or PUBLIC
HEALTH NURSE (PART-TIME)
Department - Health & Human Serv-
ices, Health Division
Location - Countywide
Salary:
R.N.-(Eff.7/3/14) $27.85-$33.87/hr.
P.H.N.-(Eff.7/3/14) $29.20-$35.52/hr.
Up to 19 hours per week - No County
benefits
Registered Nurse: Must possess a
current California Registered Nurse
license. Public Health Nurse: Must
possess a current California Regis-
tered Nurses license; Public Health
Nurse certificate with a B.S.N. de-
gree. To obtain a complete job de-
scription and an Inyo County applica-
tion form, visit www.inyocounty.us or
call (760) 878-0407. Deadline for ap-
plication: Open until filled-this re-
cruitment will remain open until posi-
tion has been filled. Must apply on
Inyo County application form.
EOE/ADA.
BISHOP PAIUTE TRIBE is currently
accepting applications for the follow-
ing positions:
FULL TIME
ADMINISTRATION - TRIBAL
ADMINISTRATOR
DOQ
Deadline: Open until filled
CDD–COMMUNITY DEVELOP-
MENT DIRECTOR
$30.90-$43.26/Hr DOQ
Deadline: Open until filled
BPDC-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
DIRECTOR
$35.00-$50.20/Hr DOQ
Deadline: Open until filled
PUBLIC WORKS–PUBLIC WORKS
DIRECTOR
$30.90-$43.26/Hr DOQ
Deadline: Open until filled
ADMINISTRATION-CULTURAL
CENTER COORDINATOR
$19.57-$27.40/Hr DOQ
Deadline: Open until filled
PART-TIME
GAS STATION–CASHIER
$9.27/Hr GRAVEYARD 10PM-6PM
Deadline:7/9/14
EDUCATION–TUTOR
$9.27-$17.30/Hr. DOQ
Deadline:7/18/14
EDUCATION–YOUTH ACTIVITIES
SPECIALIST
$14.42-$20.19/Hr. DOQ
Deadline:7/18/14
Please visit our website or tribal of-
fice for job descriptions and employ-
ment applications. www.bishop-
paiutetribe.com/Careers
Employment applications must be
filled out to be considered for any
positions 50 Tu Su Lane, Bishop, CA
93514. Ph (760) 873-3584 Fax (760)
872-1897
040 BARGAIN CORRAL
INVERSION TABLE for back and
spine health. Upside down stretch for
entire body. Great for back, neck, hip
and spine issues. $125 or best offer.
760-938-2655
NEW MOTOR OIL, sold in quarts.
Penzoil & Havoline. 80 Quarts avail.
$2.50 each. Located in Bishop. Call
Tim 775-227-0565
POULAN PRO CHAINSAW $75;
Craftsman toolbox $50, Coleman
generator, never used $50, misc.
Craftsman tools $50. Call Sanyo TV
32” & DVD Player $25 for BOTH.
661-599-7526
QUARTER HORSE AUTO HOOD
ORNAMENT Solid Chrome. Never
used. Measures 6” with all fittings.
$100. 760-873-8643
RECLINER, MED. SIZE, perfect
cond., color brown, $50. Call
760-873-4313
040 BARGAIN CORRAL
BACK COUNTRY/CROSS COUN-
TRY skiis, 205 KAZAMA; 10-11 back
country Garment boots; ASCEN-
SION climbing skins. Items in excel-
l ent cond. $89 TAKES ALL!
750-873-3203
BINOCULARS, IN GOOD condition.
Set of 3. $140 takes them all.
760-258-5631
ELVIS PRESLEY COLLECTOR!S
SHEET OF US POSAGE STAMPS.
$100. 760-873-8643
GREAT TASTING EMERGENCY
food, 20 yr. shelf life. Feeds 5 peo-
ple for 1 month, $295.00 Complete
box. Costs less than $10/day to feed
five. 760-873-3203
Don’t toss ’em! Recycle ’em! Don’t toss ’em! Recycle ’em!
The Inyo Register The Inyo Register www.inyoregister.com www.inyoregister.com
Questions? Call Us!
760-873-3535
The Inyo Register
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320 PUBLIC NOTICES
RECORDING REQUESTED BY
Western Progressive, LLC
AND WHEN RECORDED MAIL TO:
Western Progressive, LLC
2002 Summit Blvd, Suite 600
Atlanta, GA 30319
_______________________________________________________
SPACE ABOVE THIS LINE FOR RECORDER'S USE
T.S. No.: 2013-29060 Loan No.: 7143590912
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a), THE SUMMARY OF IN-
FORMATION REFERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE
RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE
COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR.
NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS
DOCUMENT ATTACHED
NOTA: SE ADJUNTA UN RESUMEN DE LA INFORMACIÓN DE
ESTE DOCUMENTO
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED
11/19/2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR
PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED
AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.
A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check
drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal
credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan
association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Sec-
tion 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this
state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all
right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the
hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust
described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or war-
ranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encum-
brances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by
the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided
in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, inter-
est thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total
amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) rea-
sonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater
on the day of sale.
Trustor: FRANK W. BUMGARNER AND SAMANTHA BUMGAR-
NER, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS
Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC
Recorded 12/5/2003 as Instrument No. 2003-0006164 in book ---,
page --- and rerecorded on --- as --- of Official Records in the office
of the Recorder of Inyo County, California,
Date of Sale: 7/22/2014 at 2:00 PM
Place of Sale: In the upstairs lobby at Inyo-Mono Title Company
873 N Main Street, Bishop, CA
Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $225,517.92
Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the
total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening
bid may be less than the total debt.
Street Address or other common designation of real property: 115
OLIVIA LN, BIG PINE, CALIFORNIA 93513-2024
A.P.N.: 018-340-14
The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness
of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown
above. If no street address or other common designation is shown,
directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending
a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first
publication of this Notice of Sale.
NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding
on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks in-
volved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien,
not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction
does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the
property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off
may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you
are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien be-
ing auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property.
You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of
outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the
county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which
may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold
more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property.
NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this no-
tice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee,
beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Cali-
fornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale
postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour-
tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your
sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled
time and date for the sale of this property, you may call
( 866) - 960- 8299 or vi si t t hi s I nt ernet Web si t e
http://altisource.com/resware/TrusteeServicesSearch.aspx using the
file number assigned to this case 2013-29060. Information about
postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in
time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the
telephone information. The best way to verify postponement informa-
tion is to attend the scheduled sale
Date: 6/13/2014 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee
c/o 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450
Irvine, CA 92606
Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299
http://altisource.com/resware/TrusteeServicesSearch.aspx
For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 240-3530
__________________________________
Tamika Smith, Trustee Sale Assistant
THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY IN-
FORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE
(IR 6/26, 7/3, 7/10/14, #11231)
175 MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT
1 BED/1BATH
West Bishop RV Park Manor
Market area, $500/mo. + $600 dep.
Available now.
323-449-1158
ELM TREE TRAILER PARK
Large and small trailers with patios &
storage units starting at $475/mo.
Judy 760-935-0088 or 760-914-2834
SPACE FOR RENT
Tooley!s Mobile Home Park, single
or double wide. Quiet, W. Bishop lo-
cation, 500 Watterson Rd., (Line
St./ Reata Rd.) $400/mo.
602-318-8695
180 SPACE FOR RENT
MEADOWLAKE APTS. & Storage
Storage Units 10x20 avail. Ask for
new customer special rate! 760-
873-7339
185 BUS. PROPERTY FOR RENT
Want a Change of Scenery?
Want to Move your Business?
We Have the PLACE for you!
OFFICE BUILDING FOR LEASE
250 N. FOWLER, BISHOP
Ideal for professional tenant. Very
attractive inside and out. Approx.
1200 sq. ft.. Four (4) separate
rooms, 1.5 bath, full kitchen
facilities. Secured parking in rear.
Adjacent to City parking lot for
additional parking. $1200/mo. +
$700 security deposit.
SHOWN BY APPT. ONLY
Day: 760-873-3774
EVENING: 760-873-7587
155 APTS. UNFURNISHED
1 & 2 BED APTS
Clean and peaceful, no pets, no
smoking. Bishop. For more info. call
760-873-3280
170 HOUSES UNFURNISHED
NICE 2 BED/1BATH
587 N. Third, Bishop. Fenced in
yard, workshop, washer/dryer.
$1200/mo. Call Judy
760-935-0088 /914-2834
3 BED/ 2 BATH
ROUND VALLEY
New home, one year old. 2 Car
garage. 40 Acres neighborhood in
Round Valley. 2 Car garage,
stream, & pond. Heavenly, unob-
structed views. Good credit a must.
One year lease. $1950/mo. Photos
& full details online at: www.bish-
oprentals.com. To view call Ed
760-608-1321
PINE CREEK VILLAGE
18 IDAHO 3 BED $950/mo.
33 DAKOTA 3 BED $925/mo.
Stove refrigerator washer and dryer
included. Pet friendly (2 max upon
approval). Call DeLaRosa Property
Management 760-872-3188
SUNNY SLOPES- 3 BED house with
workshop, deck and vi ews
$1400/mo.
BISHOP -2 BED, Trailer with small
yard, $685/mo.
DeLaRosa Property Management
760-872-3188
155 APTS. UNFURNISHED
2BED/1BATH
SMALL FENCED yard, laundry,
parking for 2 cars. Water/trash paid.
369-B Short St. No smoking. No
pets. $750/mo.
highsierrawine@yahoo.com
Chip 760-914-2076
2BED/1BATH - DOWNSTAIRS,
Carport, laundry on site. No smoking,
no pets, $750/mo. + $1200 dep.
760-275-0372
BISHOP - LARGE 1 BED in town, w/
garage, $875/mo.
SUNNY SLOPES- 1 BED w/ electric
included, $685/mo.
BISHOP - 1 BED, upstairs $695; with
lease ,$750/mo.
For full rental list call DeLaRosa
Property Management 760-872-3188
COMPACT 2 BED or 1 Bedroom +
offi ce, 1 bathroom. Yard,
washer/dryer hookups, water, sewer
and trash included. No smoking
$900/mo. + $1000 deposit. Available
now. 760-920-0165
UPSTAIRS 1 BED APT. $700/mo. +
$700 dep. Rent includes elec. & gas.
760-873-7339 Meadowlake Apts.,
Bishop.
VERY NICE & SUPER
CLEAN
1 Bed duplex with 3/4 bath, Inde-
pendence. Credit check, one year
lease required. $525 per mo. +
$750 security. No pets. Elaine,
agent.
760-878-2625
045 HELP WANTED
HOUSEKEEPING POSITIONS FULL
& part time. Apply at Best Western
Bishop Lodge, 1025 N. Main St.,
Bishop.
PEST CONTROL TECHNICIAN
postion avail. in Bishop & Lone Pine
area. Will fully train & license. Apply
at www.west-ext.com or cal l
661-273-8188
FORT INDEPENDENCE TRAVEL
Plaza and Winnedumah Winns
Casino in Independence, is looking
for hard working, dependable, honest
and committed candidates for full
and part time positions at the store
and casino. Candidates must be will-
ing to work all shifts including grave-
yard. Previous cash handling experi-
ence a plus but not necessary. All
applicants must pass a pre-employ-
ment drug screen and all casino ap-
plicants must also pass a back-
ground check. For more information
stop by the store or casino for an ap-
plication or call David @ (760)
878-2483.
Preference in hiring is given to quali-
fied Native Americans in accordance
with the Indian Preference Act (Title
25, US Code, Sections 472 and 473).
150 APTS. FURNISHED
BISHOP 2BD APT $950.00 plus
deposi t , upst ai r s i n t own
760-873-4273
155 APTS. UNFURNISHED
1BED/1BATH TRIPLEX
376 Short St., Bishop. Laundry
room on site, no smoking, no pets.
$550/mo. + dep. CALL
818-726-7703
2BED/1BATH
Downtown Bishop, Upstairs unit,
stove, oven, fridge, common area
laundry. No pets. $800/mo.
760-937-5455 Agt.
045 HELP WANTED
COOK - BREAKFAST / LUNCH
Experienced only. 40-50 Hrs./wk,
$15/hr. Alabama Hills Cafe, Lone
Pine. Apply in person 111 W. Post
St. Call between 7:00am-2:00pm
760-876-4675 or email:
seevee1233@yahoo.com
DELIVERY DRIVER, F/T
MUST BE ABLE to work any week-
night Monday through Sunday. 25
Yrs. or older preferred with clean
driving record. Apply in person with
DMV printout at Pizza Factory, 970
N. Main St.,Bishop. Ask for Matt or
Bret West.
LIFEGUARDS WANTED KEOUGHS
Hot springs. Training avail. May
include weekends & evenings
throughout school year. Pick up ap-
plications at Keoughs Hot Springs or
Brown!s Supply, 219 Wye Rd.
Bishop.
NOW HIRING!
BUS persons, sales assistants and
Cashiers. For an application, please
stop by Erick Schat!s Bakkery at 763
N. Main St., Bishop
045 HELP WANTED
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE TECH/
MECHANIC wanted. Pay dependent
on experience. Call 760-873-9147
INYO COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS
Payroll Technician II (FULL TIME)
Desired qualifications: Two years of
college level coursework in account-
ing, bookkeeping or related course-
work, Four years of increasingly re-
sponsibility in the field of payroll/per-
sonnel, payroll taxes and retirement
systems. SALARY RANGE: $77,006
- $92,680. PERS, Health & Welfare
including Blue Cross, Prescription
Card, Dental, Vision, and Behavioral
Health. Employee is required to pay
for and participate in a health plan.
Current employee cost for health
plan is $1,191.50 - $1,481.50 per
month. LOCATION: Independence,
CA. Apply online via Edjoin at
www.edjoin.org CONTACT: Marlene
Dietrich (760) 878-2426 ext. 222
EQUAL OPPORTUNI TY EM-
PLOYER
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The Inyo Register
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For Home Delivery call
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14 THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 The Inyo Register
Presenting some of the best kept secrets in town.
IMPORTANT PUBLIC NOTICE
California Business and Professions Code Section 7027, et sec. requires that any advertisement by a licensed contractor include the
contractor's license number. Section 7027.2 says that unlicensed persons whose work qualifies under the minor work exemption, less
than $500 including material and labor, may advertise, provided that he or she shall state in the advertisement that they are not licensed.
The California Contractors State License Board publishes a free booklet, 'What You Should Know Before You Hire A Contractor.' For free
information call, 1-800-321-CSLB.
GRAPHIC
DESIGN
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OF LYNELLE JO ROMERO
CASE NO: SICVPB 14-56768
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons
who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of
LYNELLE JO ROMERO
A Petition for Probate has been filed by: TYSON ROMERO, Peti-
tioner in the Superior Court of California, County of: INYO. The
Petition for Probate requests that TYSON ROMERO, Inyo County
Public Administrator, be appointed as personal representative to ad-
minister the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decendent!s will and codicils, if any, be
admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami-
nation in the file kept by the court.
The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Inde-
pendent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the
personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court
approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the
personal representative will be required to give notice to interested
persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed
action.) The independent administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows
good cause why the court should not grant the authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows:
Date: JULY 25, 2014 Time: 9:00 A.M. Dept. 3.
ADDRESS OF COURT:
Superior Court of California,
County of Inyo
168 N. Edwards Street
Independence, CA 93526
If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the
court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by
your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you
must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal rep-
resentative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general represen-
tative, as defined in Section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or
(2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a
notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other Cali-
fornia statues and legal authority may affect your rights as a
creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledge-
able in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person in-
terested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Spe-
cial Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of
estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate
Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available
from the court clerk.
ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER:
DOUGLAS BUCHANAN, ESQ
Attorney at Law
363 Academy Avenue
Bishop, CA 93514
Telephone: 760-873-4211
(IR 6/26, 7/3, 7/10/14, #11237)
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF:
LARRY K. PECKHAM
CASE NUMBER: SI CV PB 1456654
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons
who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Larry
K. Peckham
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Janet L. Kornberg in
the Superior Court of California, County of INYO.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Janet L. Kornberg be
appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the
decedent.
THE PETITION requests the decedent's will and codicils, if any, be ad-
mitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examina-
tion in the file kept by the court.
THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the
Independent Administration of Estates Act with full authority. (This
authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions
without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important
actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give
notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or con-
sented to the proposed action.) The independent administration
authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection
to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant
the authority.
A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows:
07/11/2014 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept. 3 Room No: I3 located at 168 N. Ed-
wards St., Independence CA 93526.
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at
the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the
court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by
your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent,
you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal
representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate
Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to
you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a
creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in
California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person in-
terested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for
Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of
estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate
Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available
from the court clerk.
Petitioner In Pro Per: Janet Kornberg
3315 Saint Michael Drive
Palo Alto, CA 94306, Telephone: 650-493-2567
June 19, June 25, July 2, 2014
(IR 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/14, #11218)
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
THE FOLLOWING PERSON
IS DOING BUSINESS AS:
1. FOOTHILL
MOBILE HOME & RV PARK
2. LONE PINE
MOBILE HOME & RV PARK
2541 S. Highway 395
Lone Pine, CA 93545
KEVIN MCCORMICK & HOLLY
FLOW LLC
13955 Calle De Vista
Valley Center, CA 93514
This Business is conducted by:
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY.
Registrant commenced
to transact business under
the fictitious business name or
names listed 6/01/14. This
statement was filed with the
County Clerk of Inyo County on
JUNE 19, 2014. File #14-00083
(IR 6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17/14,
#11236)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
THE FOLLOWING PERSON
IS DOING BUSINESS AS:
GSC
OFF ROAD ADVENTURES
174 S. Main St.
Bishop, CA 93514
R & P GILLESPIE, INC.
174 S. Main St.
Bishop, CA 93514
This Business is conducted by:
CORPORATION. Registrant
commenced t o t r ansact
business under the fictitious
business name or names listed
N/A. This statement was filed
with the County Clerk of Inyo
County on JUNE 12, 2014. File
#14-00079
(IR 6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 7/10/14,
#11220)
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
File No. 14-00080
The following person(s) is (are)
doing business as:
FCLS, 500 Campus Drive
#102, Morganville, CA 07751,
County of Monmouth.
Articles of Incorporation or
Organization Number: AI #ON:
N/A.
Registered owner(s):
First Choice Loan Services, Inc.,
500 Campus Drive #102, Mor-
ganville, NJ 07751.
This business is conducted by a
Corporation.
The registrant commenced to
transact business under the ficti-
tious business name or names
listed above on N/A.
I declare that all information in
this statement is true and cor-
rect. (A registrant who declares
as true information which he or
she knows to be false is guilty of
a crime.)
S/ Norman Koenigsberg, Presi-
dent.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk of Inyo on
06/13/2014
NOTICE-In accordance with
Subdivision (a) of Section
17920, a Fictitious Name State-
ment generally expires at the
end of five years from the date
on which it was filed in the office
of the County Clerk, except, as
provided in Subdivision (b) of
Section 17920, where it expires
40 days after any change in the
facts set forth in the statement
pursuant to section 17913 other
than a change in the residence
address of a registered owner. A
New Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be filed before
the expiration.
The filing of this statement does
not of itself authorize the use in
this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the
rights of another under Federal,
State, or common law (See Sec-
tion 14411 et seq., Business
and Professions Code).
Original
6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17/14
CNS-2637414#
INYO REGISTER
(IR 6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17/14,
#11226)
230 MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE
MOBILE HOME
FOR SALE
Mobile on its own lot, ready to move
in, new paint and new carpet, car-
port, nice yard with creek, owc.Call
agt.
760-937-4423
SUNLAND DRIVE
BISHOP
BRAND NEW TWO bedroom
mobile home in quiet small park,
great views, low space rent. Call
agt.
760-937-4423
240 BOATS
2009 TRACKER
PRO GLIDE V16
16! Ft. fishing boat. 4 Stroke, 40HP
Mercury outboard, Minn Kota
Trolling Motor, Dual Consoles,
Fish Finder, Bimini Top. Always
garaged LIKE NEW. Used only 8
hours. $14,000.
760-872-3139
CANOE - 3 BOATS IN ONE
Wenonah Itasca 19' double Kevlar.
12' Removable cataraft tubes affixed
to gunwales. Very seaworthy in big
water. Tubes convert to one-man
paddle craft. Custom transom, 3hp
gas motor. Center seat with rowing
rig, dark green with black trim. On
lightweight trailer. Cost $7,100, ask-
ing $4,000. 760-873-7387
260 TRAVEL TRAILERS
2006 SUNNYBROOK
TRAVEL TRAILER
27! Ft. trailer, like new, big slide out.
Must see to appreciate. $15,000
OBO.
760-873-6238
275 AUTOS
2002 FORD MUSTANG
GT COUPE
5-Speed, all power & GT extras.
Excellent cond., under 64,000 low
careful miles. Upgraded stereo/CD
system, rear spoiler, special wheels
& tires, non-smoking and pet free
owner, no scrapes or dings.
$11,250 cash. Call Stan.
Day: 760-873-7826
Evening: 760-873-6937
285 4X4
2004 FORD F-150
XLT 5.4 TRITON
4x4, New tires, tow package, runs
great, clean, sharp. 140k miles, well
mai ntai ned, rel i abl e vehi cl e.
$11,000 or best offer. Call Seth
760-876-4365
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
File No. 14-00080
The following person(s) is (are)
doing business as:
FCLS, 500 Campus Drive
#102, Morganville, CA 07751,
County of Monmouth.
Articles of Incorporation or
Organization Number: AI #ON:
N/A.
Registered owner(s):
First Choice Loan Services, Inc.,
500 Campus Drive #102, Mor-
ganville, NJ 07751.
This business is conducted by a
Corporation.
The registrant commenced to
transact business under the ficti-
tious business name or names
listed above on N/A.
I declare that all information in
this statement is true and cor-
rect. (A registrant who declares
as true information which he or
she knows to be false is guilty of
a crime.)
S/ Norman Koenigsberg, Presi-
dent.
This statement was filed with the
County Clerk of Inyo on
06/13/2014
NOTICE-In accordance with
Subdivision (a) of Section
17920, a Fictitious Name State-
ment generally expires at the
end of five years from the date
on which it was filed in the office
of the County Clerk, except, as
provided in Subdivision (b) of
Section 17920, where it expires
40 days after any change in the
facts set forth in the statement
pursuant to section 17913 other
than a change in the residence
address of a registered owner. A
New Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be filed before
the expiration.
The filing of this statement does
not of itself authorize the use in
this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the
rights of another under Federal,
State, or common law (See Sec-
tion 14411 et seq., Business
and Professions Code).
Original
6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17/14
CNS-2637414#
INYO REGISTER
(IR 6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17/14,
#11226)
220 HOUSES FOR SALE
DYER, NEVADA
2+ Acres with home
and garage / work-
shop. BLM on two
sides. Pics available
on request. $68,000
Call Marcel at 775-
224-7249
MEADOWCREEK
HOME - REDUCED!
Located in one of Bishop!s finest
neighborhoods. This beautiful home
is 3 Bed/Family Room /2.5 Baths.
Beautifully landscaped yard with hot
tub and fenced in dog area. 3 Car
garage has loads of cabinets for
storage. Recently reduced to
$389,000. Call agent, Wayne
Caddell, Mammoth Realty Group
for viewing.
760-914-1118
230 MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE
2BED/2BATH
HIGHLANDS FAMILY SECTION for
sale by owner, 1992, 900 sq. ft.,
over sized shower, laundry room, 2
sheds, privacy fence, irrigated lawn
w/ garden planter box, new roof,
fresh paint and upgraded appli-
ances. Asking $27,500.
530-307-3196 or
530-545-3228
220 HOUSES FOR SALE
4 BED / 2.5 BATHS
All new flooring, over sized two car
garage, corner lot with R.V storage
across from open land.
760 873-7109
69 OLIVIA LANE
BIG PINE
LARGE 3BED/2 BATH, 2 Car
garage, great location. big lot with
views, near fishing and hiking.
$129,000. Call Agt.
760-937-4423
BEST BUY IN BISHOP
Price slashed $40,000. Beautiful
3BED/2BATH home located on
Home St. and close to schools. All
new carpet and paint. 2 Garages-
attached 1 car and large detached
garage 560 sq. ft. w/workshop and
1/2 Bath. Priced to sell at $359,000.
Cal l agent, Wayne Caddel l ,
Mammoth Real ty Group, for
viewing.
760-914-1118
205 ACREAGE & LOTS
VACANT PARCEL ON HWY 395 in
downtown Independence $20,000!
Owner financing with only $4,000
down. Agt 760-937-5455
220 HOUSES FOR SALE
$199,900
OWN YOUR own piece of Heaven
in Dyer, NV. 2,536 Sf, 2 BED/
2 BATH home with 2-car garage
and 1,360 sf barn/shop all on 1.76
acres. Lots of trees and expansive
views of Boundary Peak. Call
Rosemary Loven / Loven Real
Estate.
760 872-4124
SPECTACULAR VIEWS
The clean, wonderful and energy
efficient Independence home is
perfection. It is 2BED or master
suite & den with 1 FULL BATH +
1 3/4 BATH. The large master has
a lovely Kohler spa tub & walk-in
closet. Come see! $279,900. Agent
Elaine
760-878-2625
Do you have
baby furniture
to sell?
Advertise in the
EASTERN SIERRA
CLASSIFIEDS
873-3535
ALL NEW WEB SITE
Check out
www.inyoregister.com
www.inyoregister.com
The Inyo Register
The Inyo Register THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 15
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
CITY OF BISHOP
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON THE PROPOSED ADOPTION
OF AN ORDINANCE RESPECTING SALARIES FOR CITY
COUNCILMEMBERS AND SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Bishop City Council will hold a
public hearing on Monday, July 14, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. in the City
Council Chambers, 301 West Line Street, Bishop, California to hear
and consider citizen input on a proposed ordinance entitled “AN
ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF BISHOP,
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, RESPECTING SALARIES FOR CITY
COUNCILMEMBERS.”
SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE: This proposed ordinance amends Sec-
tion 2.04.030 of the Bishop Municipal Code to change the salary of
each member of the City Council from Three Hundred Dollars
($300.00) per month to Five Hundred Fifty Dollars ($550.00) per
month. Councilmember salaries have not been changed since 1989.
This change in salary is made under the authority of Government
Code § 36516.
Following the public hearing, the proposed ordinance will be reviewed
for introduction, with the adoption of the ordinance scheduled for Mon-
day, July 28, 2014.
A copy of the full text of this ordinance is available for public inspec-
tion at City Hall, 377 West Line Street, Bishop, California. Any per-
sons wishing to comment are invited to attend the public hearing or
send written comments to the City Council, 377 West Line Street,
Bishop, California 93514 on or before the time of said hearing. Any
questions can be directed to the Administration Department at
760-873-5863.
(IR 7/3/14, #11247)
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
STORAGE LIEN
4J!S STORAGE- UNIT #B13
South Street, Bishop CA 93514
760-872-3188
Whiskey Creek paper docu-
ments and records will be re-
moved from storage July 15,
2014.
(IR 6/28, 7/1, 7/3/14, #11241)
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF VACANCY
BISHOP RURAL FIRE
PROTECTION DISTRICT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the Inyo County Board of
Supervisors is accepting appli-
cations to fill three vacancies on
the Bishop Rural Fire Protection
District Board of Fire Commis-
sioners, to complete four-year
terms ending July 1, 2018.
If you are interested in serving
as a Fire Commissioner on the
Bishop Rural Fire Protection
District, please submit your re-
quest for appointment on or be-
fore 5:00 p.m., July 10, 2012, to
the Board of Supervisors at P.
O. Box N, Independence, CA
93526.
(IR 7/3/14, #11249)
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF VACANCY
BISHOP RURAL FIRE
PROTECTION DISTRICT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the Inyo County Board of
Supervisors is accepting appli-
cations to fill three vacancies on
the Bishop Rural Fire Protection
District Board of Fire Commis-
sioners, to complete four-year
terms ending July 1, 2018.
If you are interested in serving
as a Fire Commissioner on the
Bishop Rural Fire Protection
District, please submit your re-
quest for appointment on or be-
fore 5:00 p.m., July 10, 2012, to
the Board of Supervisors at P.
O. Box N, Independence, CA
93526.
(IR 7/3/14, #11249)
320 PUBLIC NOTICES
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT
THE FOLLOWING PERSON
IS DOING BUSINESS AS:
GSC
OFF ROAD ADVENTURES
174 S. Main St.
Bishop, CA 93514
R & P GILLESPIE, INC.
174 S. Main St.
Bishop, CA 93514
This Business is conducted by:
CORPORATION. Registrant
commenced t o t r ansact
business under the fictitious
business name or names listed
N/A. This statement was filed
with the County Clerk of Inyo
County on JUNE 12, 2014. File
#14-00079
(IR 6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 7/10/14,
#11220)
www.inyoregister.com
(760) 873-3535
Find what you need
and what you want
in
The Inyo Register
Classifeds!
Find what you need
and what you want
in
The Inyo Register
Classifeds!
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The Inyo Register
For Home Delivery call
(760) 873-3535
Here’s a list of nonprofit organiza-
tions and/or services available to the
public. Call the number listed (if pro-
vided) at the end of each entry for more
details. (This column runs on a “space
available” basis only, and to update,
call 873-3535.) We are not responsible
for out-dated listings unless updated
information has been given to us
either in writing or over the phone.
Support
Al-Anon — A 12-step group for
families and friends of alcoholics meets
Mondays (7 p.m.) at the Methodist
Church (Fowler and Church streets) in
Sunday School building, Bishop, and
Wednesdays (6 p.m.) at Northern Inyo
Hospital Administration Building (West
Line Street and Pioneer Lane), Bishop.
Questions? Call (760) 873-8225.
Alcoholism — Christ in the
Vineyard is a Christian 12-step recovery
group for both the alcoholic and con-
cerned others. It meets each Sunday
from 12:30-1:30 at Valley Presbyterian
Church, 2912 W. Line St., Bishop.
Questions? Call 873-8960.
Alcoholics Anonymous – There
are several meetings a day, every day.
For meeting times and locations, call
(760) 873-6700 in Bishop; (760) 876-
5692 in Lone Pine; (760) 934-3434 in
Mammoth Lakes; (760) 932-7418 in
Bridgeport; or visit www.easternsier-
raaa.com.
American Red Cross – A Disaster
Action Team (DAT) covering the area
of the Bishop Fire District was formed
in 2004. The Bishop DAT provides
emergency services of the Red Cross
for small disasters for single-families or
a few families such as house or apart-
ment fires or when essential necessi-
ties are lost in a crisis. Larger disaster
relief efforts are handled by coordina-
tion with Inyo County Health and
Human Services, other social service
organizations, and/or surrounding
Red Cross chapters. For more informa-
tion or to volunteer with the American
Red Cross, please contact Ted Metz at
(760) 872-6599.
Bereavement Program – Hospice
of the Owens Valley, a nonprofit pro-
gram of Pioneer Home Health Care,
Inc., presents a periodic, eight-week
community service bereavement pro-
gram/support group led by a bereave-
ment specialist on Tuesdays, starting at
noon. The Bereavement Program
offers support and information on
how to cope with grieving the loss of a
loved one. Contact Jennifer Johnston,
MSW at (760) 872-4663.
Bishop Paiute Tribe’s Legal
Advocacy Program (WLAP) — Assists
victims of domestic violence, dating
violence, sexual assault and stalking.
Services available to the Bishop Paiute
Tribal Community include: crisis inter-
vention; peer counseling and support;
legal assistance with matters resulting
from victimization; advocacy and
accompaniment; safety planning;
community education and outreach;
and referrals when requested. Call
(760) 873-9018.
Child Care Connection, Baby
Care Network — Toy lending, provider
training, child care referral, child care
subsidies, free information (brochures,
etc.) Contact 873-5123 ext. 0 or toll free
(888) 999-5669 or FAX: (760) 873-5017
for answers to questions.
Counties of Inyo-Mono Veteran
Service Office – Provides assistance
to the men and women who served in
the Armed Forces of America, their
dependents and survivors in obtaining
benefits from the Department of
Veteran Affairs. Provides outreaches
throughout Inyo-Mono counties. For
further information, call (760) 873-
7850, fax 872-1610, e-mail: icvso@
qnet.com or visit www.countyofinyo.
org/vso.
Desert Sierra Breast Cancer
Partnership – Offers free breast
SERVICES & PROGRAMS
exams and mammograms, yearly, to
income eligible women, age 40 and
older. For more information or to find
out how to qualify, contact the Breast
Cancer Early Detection statewide toll-
free Consumer Information Helpline,
1-800-511-2300.
Eastern Sierra Area Agency on
Aging (ESAAA) — Eastern Sierra Area
Agency on Aging ESAAA) is the one-
stop center for services to seniors in
both Inyo and Mono counties. The
agency furnishes information and
assistance, provides senior centers for
lunch, activities, socialization, case
management and linkage services.
ESAAA also delivers in-home meals
and provides health insurance coun-
seling and advocacy programs. Contact
ESAAA at (760) 873-6364 or (800)
510-2020.
Eastern Sierra Legal Assistance
Program – ESLAP provides free legal
help to low-income residents of Inyo,
Mono and Alpine counties. Priorities
for ESLAP include legal issues such as
landlord-tenant, evictions, public ben-
efits, debtor protection, elder law,
health, education and employment
law. Located at 873 N. Main St., Ste.
120, Bishop, CA 93514 (first floor of the
Title Building). Call (760) 873-3581 or
(800) 736-3582.
Eastern Sierra Breast Cancer
Alliance (ESBCA) – Non-profit orga-
nization that provides resource infor-
mation, cancer support group, finan-
cial aid and wellness luncheons pro-
viding info on on healthy lifestyles for
Inyo and Mono residents. This organi-
zation helps cancer patients dealing
with any type of cancer, not just those
with breast cancer. The ESBCA
Resource Center is located at 2957
Grandview Dr., Bishop. Visit www.
esbca.org or write to P.O. Box 1523
Bishop, CA 93515. Call (760) 872-3811
to schedule an appointment.
Financial assistance – For
income-eligible households with
deprived children (absent, deceased,
unemployed parents), or for indigent
adults, contact any Social Services divi-
sion of Inyo County Health & Human
Services, 914 N. Main Street, Bishop,
872-1394, or 380 N. Mt. Whitney Drive,
Lone Pine, 876-5545, or Tecopa Hot
Springs Road, Tecopa, 852-4141.
For Adoptive Parents — A support
and educational service group for
adopting and adoptive Eastern Sierra
individuals and for those in process of
adoption. For more information, call
Leslie, 935-4356 or Nancy, 387-2228.
HICAP of Inyo and Mono – Health
insurance counseling and advocacy
program. Free counseling for Medicare,
Medicare supplemental insurance, pre-
scription drug insurance and advantage
plans in Inyo and Mono counties. Call
(760) 872-2043 or 800-434-0222; or
email klittle@hicapimc.org.
Hospice Lending Library – A free
hospice lending library is available to
local community residents Monday,
Wednesday and Friday from 1-5 p.m.
Resources are available on topics such
as the end of life process, living well,
varying emotions and grief support.
The library is located at Pioneer Home
Health Care, 162 E. Line St., Bishop.
Call (760) 872-4663.
Inyo County Behavioral Health
– Offers ongoing mental health, alco-
hol and drug treatment services for
people who live in Inyo County and
receive MediCal or who are income
eligible. We offer our drop-in clinic to
anyone in the public who has an
urgent behavioral health need and-or
needs assistance to connect with
appropriate services in the community.
The drop-in clinic is offered in Bishop
at 162 J Grove. St. Mondays from 9-11
a.m. and Tuesday-Friday from 1-3 p.m.
The drop-in clinic is also offered in
Lone Pine at 380 Mt. Whitney on
Wednesdays from 1-3 p.m. Call 873-
6533 with any questions.
Inyo County Health and Human
Services Resources Library – The
Resource Library has books and vid-
eos available on a variety of topics
such as: Parenting, Pregnancy & Health
Issues, Self Esteem, Eating Disorders,
Alcohol and Substance Abuse, Tobacco
Prevention, Community Action
Programs and much more. For more
information on how to access the
resource library, contact Karen or Lisa
at 872-4245.
Inyo-Mono Advocates for
Community Action (IMACA) –
Provides emergency services such as
food, shelter and energy assistance.
Low-income housing is available to
those who meet eligibility require-
ments. For more information call (760)
873-8557 or stop by our offices at 224
S. Main Street, Bishop, Mondays-
Fridays, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Inyo-Mono Senior Legal
Program – Inyo-Mono Senior Legal
Program provides free legal help to
60-year and older residents of Inyo
and Mono counties on most legal
issues. Located at 873 N. Main St.,
Bishop, CA 93514 (first floor of the Title
Building). Call (760) 873-3581 or 1
(800) 736-3582.
Mediation – Eastern Sierra
Mediation Services is a community
service sponsored by the Superior
Court of California, County of Inyo.
Mediation is a proven process for
helping people resolve their disputes,
for example between neighbors, buy-
ers and sellers, tenants and landlords,
and other civil disputes. Mediation is
available before or after litigation is
filed with the Court. Contact (760) 872-
4852 or inyo.adr@inyocourt.ca.gov
for more information.
MOPS – Mothers of Preschoolers
meets the second Tuesday of each
month, September through May) at
Calvary Baptist Church, 1100 W. Line
St., Bishop, from 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Mothers of children ages newborn to
pre-K, including moms-to-be, are
invited to attend for dessert, crafts,
guest speakers and more. Childcare
not available. Find the group on
Facebook under MOPS Bishop or call
CBC at (760) 872-8136. More informa-
tion on MOPS at, MOPS International,
can be found at www.mops.org.
Narconon — Do you have a family
member who can’t quit using drugs? If
nothing seems to work, call Narconon.
Narconon provides free assessment,
evaluation and referral services to
internationally-recognized alternative
and traditional facilities. When con-
tinuing relapse is a problem, call
Narconon at (800) 468-6933 or visit
the website at www.addictionservices.
com.
Overeaters Anonymous — Is
food a problem for you? Do you eat
when you’re not hungry? Do you go on
eating binges for no apparent reason? Is
your weight affecting the way you live
your life? Try Overeaters Anonymous,
a no dues, no fees, no weigh-ins, no diet
12-step fellowship. For more informa-
tion, call (760) 872-3757 or try a meet-
ing in the library of Calvary Baptist
Church, 1100 W. Line St., Bishop,
Saturdays at 10 a.m. and Tuesdays at
5:30 p.m.
Parenting Info and Support –
Trainings and special events are open
to teachers and parents. Free lending
library and parenting resources avail-
able. Call Child Care Connection at
873-5123, ext. 25.
Ryan White HIV CARES Program
– Confidential emergency assistance
for those affected by HIV/AIDS. For
more information, call Health division,
Inyo County Health & Human Services,
873-7868.
Speech-to-Speech — For
Californians with speech disability, call
Shelley Friedson-Williams, Outreach
Consultant, (800) 854-7784 for imme-
diate assistance. For other inquiries,
call: (916) 444-2230 V/TTY; (800) 500-
4498 V/TTY; or, FAX (916) 444-3026.
TOPS — Take Off Pounds Sensibly,
a nonprofit group, meets Thursdays,
5:30-6:30 p.m. in clubhouse, Highlands
Adult Mobile Home Park. For more
information, call Pat at 872-1256 or
Betty at 938-2632.
Wild Iris Family Services — Wild
Iris offers support groups for those
affected by domestic violence and
sexual assault. The groups offer discus-
sion on topics of interest to group
participants. Groups are held on
Wednesdays the Bishop, Coleville and
Lone Pine offices and on Fridays at the
Mammoth Lakes office. All groups
begin at noon. For more info, call:
Bishop, (760) 873-6601; Mammoth
Lakes, (760) 934-2491; Lone Pine,
(760) 876-4740; Coleville/Walker,
(530) 495-1500.
Women in Military Service for
America, Inc., Foundation — WIMSA
is looking for women who have served
in any branch of the military, living or
deceased. This is not a club, no meet-
ings, no dues just a one-time charter
minimum fee. If you have questions
call 1 (800) 222-2294 (Washington
D.C.).
Board meetings
Big Pine
Big Pine Unified School District
Board of Trustees: First Monday of
every month, 6:30 p.m. in Room 2 of
the High School Building (unless other-
wise specified).
Big Pine Community Services
District: Third Wednesday, 7 p.m. in
Service District office.
Bishop
Bishop City Council: Second and
fourth Monday, 7 p.m. at Bishop City
Hall, 377 W. Line St. 873-5863.
Bishop Chamber of Commerce &
Visitors Bureau: Third Thursday,
Board of Directors meets at 11 a.m.,
General Membership meets at noon,
Whiskey Creek Restaurant, 524 N.
Main St., Bishop, 873-8405.
Bishop Rural Fire
Protection District: First Thursday at
the Bishop Fire Station, 209 W. Line St.
873-5485.
Bishop Union School District:
Third Thursday of the month at 6:30
p.m. at the Bishop Union High School
Library, 301 N. Fowler St., Bishop.
City of Bishop Parks and
Recreation Commission: Fourth
Wednesday of the month, 5:15 p.m., in
the Council Chambers, 301 W. Line St.,
Bishop.
Eastern Sierra Breast Cancer
Alliance (ESBCA) organization: First
Wednesday of each month, 5:15 p.m.,
at Northern Inyo Hospital in Bishop.
For more information, call ESBCA at
(760) 920-8946; leave a message. Or
write to P.O. Box 1523, Bishop, CA
93515.
Freedom in Motion: Board of
Directors meets the third Tuesday of
January, April, July and October at 7
p.m. at the Bishop Pizza Factory. Call
(760) 933-2606 for more information.
Inyo-Mono Association for the
Handicapped (IMAH) Board of
Directors, meets third Thursday, each
month , 5:30 p.m., IMAH office, 371 S.
Warren St., Bishop. Call the Beth at the
IMAH office, (760) 873-8668.
Inyo County Democratic Central
Committee: The Inyo County
Democratic Central Committee meets
at 6 p.m. on the second Tuesday of
each month at 800 S. Barlow Ln. in
Bishop. For more information call
(760) 258-1320.
Local Transportation
Commission: Third Wednesday in the
Bishop City Council Chambers.. Call
Jeff Jewett, 878-0263.
Northern Inyo Hospital Auxiliary
Board: Second Wednesday, 10 a.m.,
hospital, Sharon Moore, 872-4198.
Pioneer Cemetery District
Board: Meets the third Thursday of
each month at 9 a.m. at the West Line
Street Cemetery.
Tri-County Fair Association: Meets
the third Wednesday of the month,
with some exceptions. For more infor-
mation, call Jim Tatum, 873-3588.
Cartago/Olancha
Cartago Mutual Water Co. Inc.:
First Saturday each month, noon, at
well-house. Also, annual meeting, sec-
ond Saturday in May, 10 a.m.. Write —
Attn: Tom Dack, Cartago Mutual Water
Co., Inc., P.O. Box 209, Olancha, CA
93549.
Independence
American Legion Post 265 –
Meets the second Wednesday of each
month, except for June, July and
August, at 7:30 p.m. at the Legion Hall
in Independence. For more informa-
tion call Jim Bilyeu at 878-2216.
Independence Civic Club: Meets
first Monday of every month at the
Lions Clubhouse; potluck at 6:30 p.m.
and business meeting at 7 p.m. Call
(760) 878-2053 or visit www.inyo-
county.info.
Inyo-Mono Resource
Conservation District: Second
Wednesday each month, 7 p.m., Inyo
County Courthouse, supervisors’ cham-
bers. Write: 136 Edwards St., Bishop
93514 or Rt. 1, 851 Goodwin Rd., Lone
Pine, CA 93545.
Independence Cemetery District.
The third Tuesday of every month at 9
a.m. in the cemetery building. Call
(760) 878-1000 for more information.
Owens Valley Booster Club:
Meets 5:15 p.m. first Tuesday of the
month at the school.
Keeler
Keeler Community Service District
(water supply): Second Tuesday each
month, 6 p.m., Keeler firehouse. Write:
P.O. Box 107, Keeler, 93530.
Lone Pine
Lone Pine Chamber of Commerce:
First Tuesday, 7 a.m. at 120 S. Main,
876-4444.
Lone Pine Community Services
District (sewage disposal): meets third
Thursday, 7 p.m., Statham Hall, 138 N.
Jackson St., 876-5987.
Lone Pine Unified School District
Board of Trustees: Most meetings are
held the third Wednesday of each
month at 5 p.m., District Conference
Room, 301 S. Hay St. No meetings will
be held in July. 876-5579.
Southern Inyo Hospital Board:
Fourth Thursday, 3 p.m. at the hospital,
501 E. Locust, Lone Pine, 876-5501.
Southern Inyo Hospital Auxiliary:
Alternating board and general mem-
bership meetings every other month.
For more information, call SIH at 876-
5501 or Grace at 876-5218.
Volunteer Hospice of Southern
Inyo: Meets monthly at Southern Inyo
Hospital. For more information, call
SIH at 876-5501.
Mustang Mesa
Mesa Community Board of
Directors: meets on the third Thursday
of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the
Cudney residence located at 408
Arboles Drive on Mustang Mesa.
Olancha
Olancha Community Services
District (fire and rescue): Meets third
Thursday, at 6:30 p.m. at the Olancha
firehouse.
Community
AARP — American Association of
Retired Persons, Bishop chapter, meets
on the first Friday of each month, 1:15
p.m., at the Bishop Senior Center, 506
Park Avenue. For more information call
Danielle White, 873-5839.
Alcohol and Drug Advisory
Board – Meets once a month at the
Wellness Center at 587 N. Third St.,
Bishop. Call 873-6533 for dates and
times or more information.
Altrusa International of the
Eastern Sierra (Bishop) — Comprised
of public-spirited women dedicated to
making a difference through service in
community focusing on literacy-relat-
ed projects. Members strive to identify
and fulfill needs, which may not be
adequately addressed by governmen-
tal or other established programs. The
club is one of 23 in Dist. 11. Altrusa
International was established in 1917.
The Bishop club meets the second
Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. and
fourth Thursday at noon at Whiskey
Creek for the program meeting. Guests
are welcome. For more information,
call President Joanne Parsons at (760)
872-7944 or visit www.altrusaes.org.
American Legion Unit 118
Auxiliary – Meets the first Tuesday of
each month at 3:30 p.m. in the Alta
One Federal Credit Union Conference
Room off Main Street in Bishop.
Contact (760) 872-7035 or (760) 873-
5839.
American Legion Unit 118 —
Meets the first Wednesday of each
month, except for July and August, at
6:30 p.m. at the VFW, American Legion
Hall, 484 Short St. in Bishop. For more
information, call Ray White at 873-
5839 or Roger Petersen at 873-5152.
American Legion Post 118 Riders
Motorcycle Group — Meets the fourth
Saturday of each month, 11 a.m. at
various in locations in Bishop. Bring
your own motorcycle for a luncheon
ride after the meeting. For more
information and location of meeting,
call Bob Dulude, (760) 873-6305, or
Paul Saunders, (760) 263-5152.
American Legion Post 265 –
Meets the second Wednesday of
each month, except for June, July and
August, at 7:30 p.m. at the Legion
Hall in Independence. For more
information, e-mail bilyeu1@sud-
denlink.net or call Jim Bilyeu at (760)
878-2216.
American Legion Post 457 and
Ladies Auxiliary – Meets the second
Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at
the Big Pine Town Hall on Dewey
Street. For more information, e-mail
glacierpost457@live.com.
Bishop Creek Water Association
— Meets monthly the first Tuesday,
6:30 p.m. in conference room at the
Los Angeles Department of Water and
Power on Mandich Street, Bishop.
Bishop Elks Lodge 1603— Meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of
each month, at 6 p.m. at 151 E. Line
St., Bishop. For more information,
call the Lodge at 873-3221.
Bishop Lions Club — Meets every
Thursday, 11:45 a.m. at the Patio
Building, Tri-County Fairgrounds. For
membership information or luncheon
meeting arrangements, contact A.J.
Hooper at 872-1256.
Bishop Toastmasters — A public
speaking practice training group.
Meets every 2nd and 4th Monday
each month (unless otherwise noti-
fied) from noon-1 p.m. in the Caltrans
District Office in the Mt. Whitney
Room in Bishop. For more informa-
tion, call Tony Campbell at 873-9200.
Cafe of Learning – A toy, book,
music and video library open to the
public. Delicious possibilities for all
ages. Call 873-5123, ext. 329 for a
menu of tantalizing educational
resources.
Calico Quilters Guild – The
Calico Quilters Guild of Bishop is a
local, non-profit organization that
meets the last Tuesday and Thursday
of each month. The purpose of the
guild is to encourage quilters through
an interchange of ideas. Members
share a love quilts, their history and
the art of quiltmaking. The guild
hosts monthly workshops, small
group activities and community ser-
vice projects. All quilters, from
experts to beginners, are welcome
and invited to visit meetings, where
they will find many friends, new
techniques and creative learning
experiences. For meeting info, con-
tact Vivian Mitchel at 872-4774.
FACES&PLACES
Beating the summer heat in Bishop
ADULTS AND YOUTH ALIKE FINDING WAYS TO KEEP COOL IN 100-PLUS DEGREES
THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014
The Inyo Register
16
Bishop City Park Pool lifeguards Nancy Gonzales and Christopher
Molina brave the heat to watch over youth having fun and cooling
off. Darin Harding’s dogs staying hydrated to combat the heat.
Darin Harding, owner of local Sage Restaurant, helps his dog stay
cool in the summer heat.
Among the youth taking advantage of the Bishop City Pool as a way to keep cool during this week’s heat wave were: (l-r) Sean Beavers,
William Rafferty, Zevin Crockett, Cody Beaver, Zayne Crockett and Jordan Deason.
Photos by Thomas Sills
Bishop teens Jacy Dagenhart (l) and Caylan Johnson (r) ventured
to Buckley Pond Tuesday to take a dip and stay cool in the rising
summer temperatures.
William Rafferty flies off the diving board at the Bishop City Park
Pool on Tuesday.
Young swimmer Ben Giesing cannon balling into the Bishop Park
Pool.
City of Bishop Recreation Supervisor Waylon Cleland enjoying his
recreation time and battling the high temperatures at the Bishop
City Park with daughters Aurora Cleland (c) and Evabell Cleleand
(l).
Young swimmers including (l-r) Keeton Coffman, Cole Coffman,
Charlie Butler and Brody Bulter were unfazed by the heat as they
enjoyed their summer break at the Bishop City Park Pool.
Jacy Dagenhart jumping into Buckley Pond on Tuesday, July 1st in
hopes of escaping the near 100 degree temperature.
ARTS&LEISURE
THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014
The Inyo Register
17
Register Staff
The following bestseller list is for the
week ending June 26, based on sales in hun-
dreds of independent bookstores nation-
wide – including Spellbinder Books in
Bishop.
This list was compiled by IndieBound, a
national, socially-conscious movement to
encourage support of independent busi-
nesses and shopping locally. The effort
began with independent bookstores.
Hardcover Fiction
1. “The Silkworm,” Robert Galbraith, J.K. Rowling,
Mulholland, $28
2. “The Goldfinch,” Donna Tartt, Little Brown, $30
3. “Written in My Own Heart’s Blood,” Diana
Gabaldon,
Delacorte, $35
4. “Mr. Mercedes,” Stephen King, Scribner, $30
5. “Top Secret Twenty-One,” Janet Evanovich,
Bantam, $28
6. “All the Light We Cannot See,” Anthony Doerr,
Scribner, $27
7. “All Fall Down,” Jennifer Weiner, Atria, $26.99
8. “Midnight in Europe,” Alan Furst,
Random House, $27
9. “The Invention of Wings,” Sue Monk Kidd,
Viking, $27.95
10. “The Matchmaker,” Elin Hilderbrand,
Little Brown, $28
11. “The One & Only,” Emily Giffin, Ballantine, $28
12. “China Dolls,” Lisa See, Random House, $27
13. “The Vacationers,” Emma Straub,
Riverhead, $26.95
14. “The Last Kind Words Saloon,” Larry McMurtry,
Liveright, $24.95
15. “The Rise & Fall of Great Powers,” Tom
Rachman, Dial Press, $27
Hardcover Non-Fiction
1. “Hard Choices,” Hillary Rodham Clinton, S&S, $35
2. “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” Thomas
Piketty, Belknap Press, $39.95
3. “Everything I Need to Know I Learned From a
Little Golden Book,” Diane Muldrow, Golden Books,
$9.99
4. “Think Like a Freak,” Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J.
Dubner, Morrow, $28.99
5. “Flash Boys,” Michael Lewis, Norton, $27.95
6. “Unbroken,” Laura Hillenbrand,
Random House, $28
7. “Tibetan Peach Pie,” Tom Robbins, Ecco, $27.99
8. “Carsick,” John Waters, FSG, $26
9. “David and Goliath,” Malcolm Gladwell, Little
Brown, $29
10. “A Fighting Chance,” Elizabeth Warren,
Metropolitan, $28
11. “One Nation,” Ben Carson, M.D., Candy Carson,
Sentinel, $25.95
12. “The Closer,” Mariano Rivera, Little Brown, $28
13. “Congratulations, by the Way,” George
Saunders,
Random House, $14
14. “Stress Test,” Timothy Geithner, Crown, $35
15. “No Place to Hide,” Glenn Greenwald,
Metropolitan, $27
Paperback Fiction
1. “Gone Girl,” Gillian Flynn, Broadway, $15
2. “And the Mountains Echoed,” Khaled Hosseini,
Riverhead, $16
3. “The Ocean at the End of the Lane,” Neil Gaiman,
Morrow, $14.99
4. “The Silver Star,” Jeannette Walls, Scribner, $16
5. “Orphan Train,” Christina Baker Kline, Morrow,
$14.99
6. “Beautiful Ruins,” Jess Walter, Harper Perennial,
$15.99
7. “Americanah,” Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie,
Anchor, $15.95
8. “The Lowland,” Jhumpa Lahiri, Vintage, $15.95
9. “Bad Monkey,” Carl Hiaasen, Grand Central, $15
10. “Where’d You Go, Bernadette,” Maria Semple,
Back Bay, $14.99
11. “The Cuckoo’s Calling,” Robert Galbraith, J.K.
Rowling, Mulholland, $18
12. “The Circle,” Dave Eggers, Vintage, $15.95
13. “The Interestings,” Meg Wolitzer, Riverhead, $17
14. “The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls,” Anton
DiSclafani, Riverhead, $16
15. “The Rosie Project,” Graeme Simsion, S&S,
$15.99
Paperback Non-Fiction
1. “The Boys in the Boat,” Daniel James Brown,
Penguin, $17
See BESTSELLERS E Page 18
INDIE BESTSELLER LIST
The Reel Deal
Fighting for America
By Christopher Kulik
Reviews of notable new releases …
‘Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit’ (PG-13)
The fifth movie based on Tom Clancy’s spy character – fol-
lowing “The Hunt for Red October” (1990), “Patriot Games”
(1992), “Clear and Present Danger” (1994) and “The Sum of All
Fears” (2002) – is a reboot in the most traditional sense, chart-
ing Jack Ryan’s journey from fallen Marine in Afghanistan to
covert CIA analyst as he gets entangled with a corrupt Russian
business tycoon (director Kenneth Branagh). Like all the previ-
ous Jack Ryan films, this is entertaining and enjoyable as an
action yarn, but I’ve always felt this character lacks the panache
of other contemporary screen spies like Jason Bourne or James
Bond. That being said, Chris Pine (better known as Captain
Kirk in the “Star Trek” franchise) is ingratiating enough in the
title role that I would like to see him return, along with co-
stars Kiera Knightley as Ryan’s wife and Kevin Costner as the
CIA official who recruits our hero. “Jack Ryan: Shadow
Recruit” is dedicated to Tom Clancy, who passed away on Oct.
1, 2013; he was the author of 17 best-selling novels including
his first, “The Hunt for Red October,” published in 1984.
‘Lone Survivor’ (R)
In 2005, four Navy SEALS were sent into war-torn
Afghanistan to locate and execute a key Taliban connection,
but things go disastrously wrong. Based on the best-selling
book by Marcus Luttrell, the sole survivor of Operation Red
Wings, “Lone Survivor” is a disquieting, emotionally wrench-
ing experience – a story of brotherhood and courage amidst
unrelenting combat. Writer/director Peter Berg (“Battleship”)
and producer/star Mark Wahlberg have fashioned what I
believe earns its place among the Great War Films: “The Big
Parade” (1926), “All Quiet on the Western Front” (1930),
“Paths of Glory” (1957), “Apocalypse Now” (1979), “Platoon”
(1986) and “Saving Private Ryan” (1998). Kudos especially to
the indomitable stunt team (many were injured during film-
ing) for their bone-snapping commitment to realism; cinema-
tographer Tobias Schliessler, for his amazing shots of the
Sangre de Cristo Mountains in New Mexico; and, finally, for the
intense score provided by Explosions in the Sky, with the song
“Heroes” performed by Peter Gabriel and the New Blood
Orchestra.
‘RoboCop’ (PG-13)
In 1987, director Paul Verhoeven’s gory, ultraviolent
“RoboCop” was released to surprising critical acclaim and box
office success, even winning an Academy Award. Genre-ally
speaking, it’s a perfect action movie and a perfect piece of sci-
ence fiction, but it’s also a brilliantly funny satire; as Denny
Martin Flynn notes in his book “How Not to Write a Screenplay,”
what he loved about “RoboCop” is that underneath all the
action there’s a wonderful theme: “too much capitalism breeds
a new fascism, a dictatorship by private concerns – he who has
the most money sets the law.” The new “RoboCop” drains all
the blood and excises the brutality to keep the violence strictly
within PG-13 parameters, and while the original’s satiric bite is
long gone, the new movie manages to create and respect its
own environment, providing interesting commentary on drones
and free will. That being said, the new “RoboCop” also reminds
one of the 6000 SUX from the original – a corporate (OCP)
product which is sleek, shiny and polished to appeal to as
many willing-to-pay audiences as possible. And this 6000 SUX
is on cruise control the entire time, never really fully engaging
us with all of its ideas and a weird cast which includes Gary
Oldman, Michael Keaton and Samuel L. Jackson.
(Christopher Kulik is a Bishop resident. He works at The
Video Place at 251 N. Main St. and has written more than 500
film reviews for various online publications. He is also a Navy
veteran and American Legion member.)
“Jack Ryan:
Shadow Recruit”
“Lone Survivor”
“RoboCop”
My Picks for Flicks
The best of the bunch
Reviews of movies playing
at Bishop Twin Theatre …
‘Transformers: Age of
Extinction”
Facts:
“Transformers: Age of
Extinction” was filmed in
Texas and China. The motto
of the film is: “Prepare for
extinction.” “Transformers:
Age of Extinction” is two
hours and 45 minutes long.
The director of the film is
Michael Bay and the writer is
Ehren Kruger. Michael Bay
also directed “The Purge”
with Ethan Hawke. Two of
the songs they played in the
film are by Imagine Dragons:
“Battle Cry” and “All for
You.”
Fun Facts:
Star Mark Wahlberg was in
“Lone Survivor,” an awesome
Navy Seals movie. He was
also in “The Fighter” with
Christian Bale. Co-star Nicola
Peltz was in “The Last
Airbender” with Noah
Ringer.
Review:
I liked this Transformers
better than all the other
Transformers movies. The
music in the movie was really
good. My favorite Autobot in
“Transformers” is Leadfoot.
He has awesome weapons
like guns, bombs and swords.
I think Mark Wahlberg did
great playing Cade Yeager. It
was cool to see parts of China
in the film like The Great
Wall. “Transformers: Age of
Extinction” reminds me of
“Pacific Rim” because of the
robots. If you are a robot
movie buff you will like this
movie. I liked “Transformers”
because it had huge explo-
sions and great special
effects. I really liked the
Dino-bots because they are
transformers that look like
huge dinosaurs that breathe
fire.
About Bryce:
I was born and raised in
Bishop. I live with my mom,
dad and my sister, Presley. I
go to Bishop Elementary
School and I’m going into the
fourth grade. I’m also a huge
movie buff.
As readers can imagine, the
book, “King of
Methamphetamine Valley,” is
based on Smith’s experiences
as an ATF agent conducting
investigations out of the
Fresno office. More specifical-
ly, Smith says, the novel is
based on an investigation
Smith, who hails from Ohio,
conducted in California back
in 1990.
“I had to fictionalize the
case to make the story – which
was interesting and danger-
ous in its own rights – market-
able,” Smith says. “The central
narrative is really a love story,
even though it’s surrounded
by the horrors of metham-
phetamine and the bikers who
were cooking it in the high
desert canyons back then.”
Former ATF agent writes novel
based on experiences in the field
Book includes
references
to Inyo County
Register Staff
The Inyo County communi-
ties of Big Pine and Bishop are
featured in a recently released
novel written by a former
agent with the Bureau of
Alcohol, Tobacco and
Firearms.
According to author Steven
Smith, the two High Desert
towns figure into a plot featur-
ing an escape for two main
characters on the run.
“I know the area and once
conducted investigations there
for ATF,” he says.
The novel is set primarily in
Bakersfield during the spring
of 1990. Smith’s actual investi-
gation unfolded in Kern
County, thought by many to
be the epicenter of illegal drug
labs, Smith says.
According to Smith, “It was
a time and place when motor-
cycle gangs controlled meth-
amphetamine production in
the San Joaquin Valley. The
novel’s about an outlaw biker
president being hounded by a
rookie ATF agent on his trail
and a woman the young agent
meets at a local diner.” What
the agent doesn’t know, Smith
explains, is the waitress serv-
ing him lunch is also the live-
in girlfriend of the man he’s
investigating. To complicate
matters even more, he falls for
her.
Smith, 51, is from Akron
and has taught high school
English in Ohio since 1994.
He admits that since retiring
in 2013, he still loves litera-
ture and language and was
looking for a new challenge in
the field. According to Smith,
he never imagined he’d be
writing about his ATF experi-
ences some 20 years later, but
that October he made up his
mind to write a full-length
novel.
“King of Methamphetamine
Valley” is available on Amazon
under the author’s full name,
Steven Richard Smith, in
paperback format as well as
on the Kindle platform.
Author Steven Smith
COLUMNIST
BRYCE LYONS
07.14.14
Schat’s Bakkery
delivers a low-
sugar alternative
with its new
healthy and
approved Pinto
Bean Bread
formulated
by Dr. Frank
Shallenberger
Dr. Frank Shallenberger’s
Pinto Bean Bread
Ingredients: Pinto Beans; Rye Flour, Organic
Whole Wheat Flour; Bishop Well
Water; Rice Flour; Flax-,
Sesame-, Poppy-, and
Sunflower Seeds;
Canola/Olive Oil;
Sea Salt; Honey;
Baker’s Yeast.
This high-fiber, high-
protein bread is the
best bread I have ever
tasted! And, the blood
sugar response is 30
percent less than regular
bread.That meant that
it is more suitable for
my patients who need
to keep a lid on their
carbohydrate intake.
– Dr. Frank Shallenberger,
Nevada Center of
Anti-Aging Medicine,
Carson City, NV
Dancing and music
in Independence
Volunteers helping to
prep for Friday’s “legend-
ary” deep-pit barbecue in
Independence – a process
that involves slow roasting
beef over hot coals, under-
ground, overnight – will be
treated to some live music
and dancing first.
And the public is invited
to join them as they kick
off the community’s equal-
ly legendary Fourth of July
festivities.
The dancing and music
will run from 8
p.m.-midnight tonight at
Dehy Park, with Zack Smith
performing.
Conservation art
unveiled
Join Eastern Sierra Land
Trust for the Grand
Opening Reception of its
sixth annual Art for
Conservation Show and
Sale, taking place from 5-7
p.m. today at the Mono
Council for the Arts
Gallery in Mammoth Lakes.
The show’s stunning
original artwork captures
the Eastern Sierra’s most
treasured vistas: from the
towering Sierra Crest to
the winding Owens River,
and everything in between.
Admission is free and
open to the public, and
proceeds will benefit
ESLT’s work to preserve
the Eastside’s vital wild
and working lands.
For more information,
visit www.eslt.org.
The gallery is located
inside Minaret Mall (437
Old Mammoth Rd.)
between Rocky Mountain
Chocolate Factory and
Tailwaggers.
Millpond 2014 fast
approaching
Inyo Council for the
Arts is filling out the line-
up for the upcoming 23rd
Annual Millpond Music
Festival, scheduled for
Sept. 19-21 at Millpond
County Park west of
Bishop.
“The 2014 Main Stage
lineup will be amazing and
you won’t want to miss
one single performance,” a
spokesperson said.
True to its roots,
Millpond looks to be bring-
ing together an eclectic
collection of bands and
performers yet again.
As of early July, artists
confirmed to perform
include: The Trespassers;
Bootstrap Circus; David
Bromberg; Mary Jane
Lamond and Wendy
MacIsaac; Vance Gilbert;
Gordie Mackeeman and his
Rhythm Boys; The Bills;
Tyler Mathew Smith; Walt
Keale; Chris Hillman and
Herb Pederson; David
Jacob Strain; and
Mamajowali.
Tickets are on sale now.
For more information, visit
www.inyo.org, call (760)
873-8014 or stop by the
ICA at 137 S. Main St.,
Bishop.
Post-fireworks party
at Rusty’s
July 4 revelers are invit-
ed to head over to Rusty’s
Saloon tomorrow night for
live music and dancing
after the Bishop Volunteer
Fire Department’s annual
pyrotechnics show at the
Bishop Airport.
The patriotic-themed
party gets under way at
9:30 p.m., with The Last
Chance Band taking the
stage at 10 p.m.
Rusty’s is located at 112
N. Main St., Bishop,
For more information,
visit Rusty’s on Facebook.
Monday melodies
The Bishop Community
Band is continuing its sum-
mer concert series at
Bishop City Park.
The public is invited to
bring a chair or blanket
and settle in at 8 p.m.
every Monday for a free
concert of music ranging
from Big Band-era tunes to
pop songs and selections
in between.
Wilderness Act
celebration
Friends of the Inyo will
partner with the Sierra Club
and the Wilderness Society
this Saturday to celebrate
the 50th anniversary of the
passage of the Wilderness
Act. Join them from noon-6
p.m. at Mammoth Creek
Park at Mammoth Lakes.
There will be music,
creek exploration, demon-
strations and guided walks
on the Mammoth Greenway
System. More details are
available at friendsofthei-
nyo.org or by calling (760)
873-6500.
BRIEFS
BESTSELLERS
Continued from page 17
2. “Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls,” David Sedaris,
Back Bay, $17
3. “Behind the Beautiful Forevers,” Katherine Boo,
Random House, $16
4. “One Summer: America, 1927,” Bill Bryson, Anchor,
$16.95
5. “Lawrence in Arabia,” Scott Anderson,
Anchor, $17.95
6. “Heaven Is for Real,” Todd Burpo,
Thomas Nelson, $16.99
7. “Orange Is the New Black,” Piper Kerman, Spiegel &
Grau, $16
8. “Wild,” Cheryl Strayed, Vintage, $15.95
9. “Brain on Fire,” Susannah Cahalan, S&S, $16
10. “The Power of Habit,” Charles Duhigg, Random
House, $16
11. “Proof of Heaven,” Eben Alexander, M.D.,
S&S, $15.99
12. “Dad Is Fat,” Jim Gaffigan,
Three Rivers Press, $15.99
13. “Hyperbole and a Half,” Allie Brosh,
Touchstone, $17.99
14. “Quiet,” Susan Cain, Broadway, $16
15. “Revolutionary Summer,” Joseph J. Ellis,
Vintage, $15.95
CHILDREN’S BOOKS
Children’s Interest
1. “The Fault in Our Stars,” John Green,
Dutton, $17.99
2. “Looking for Alaska,” John Green, Speak, $9.99
3. “Paper Towns,” John Green, Speak, $9.99
4. “The Book Thief,” Markus Zusak,
Knopf, $12.99
5. “An Abundance of Katherines,” John Green,
Speak, $9.99
6. “Wonder,” R.J. Palacio, Knopf, $15.99
7. “If I Stay,” Gayle Forman, Speak, $10.99
8. “Minecraft: Essential Handbook,”
Scholastic, $7.99
9. “Minecraft: Redstone Handbook,” Scholastic, $7.99
10. “The Giver,” Lois Lowry, Laurel-Leaf, $6.99
11. “We Were Liars,” E. Lockhart, Delacorte, $17.99
12. “Will Grayson, Will Grayson,” John Green,
David Levithan, Speak, $9.99
13. “Frozen: The Junior Novelization,” Random House/
Disney, $4.99
14. “Eleanor & Park,” Rainbow Rowell,
St. Martin’s Griffin, $18.99
15. “The Glass Sentence,” S.E. Grove,
Viking Children’s Books, $17.99
Illustrated
1. “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” Dr. Seuss,
Random House, $17.99
2. “Goodnight Moon,” Margaret Wise Brown, Clement
Hurd (Illus.), Harper, $8.99
3. “The Day the Crayons Quit,” Drew Daywalt, Oliver
Jeffers (Illus.), Philomel, $17.99
4. “Frozen (Little Golden Book),” Victoria Saxon,
Grace Lee (Illus.), Random House/Disney, $3.99
5. “The Pigeon Needs a Bath!” Mo Willems,
Disney Press, $16.99
6. “The Very Hungry Caterpillar,”
Eric Carle, Putnam, $10.99
7. “Frozen: Anna’s Act of Love/Elsa’s Icy Magic,”
Lisa Marsoli, Joey Chou (Illus.), Random House/Disney,
$4.99
8. “Frozen (Big Golden Book),” Bill Scollon,
Disney Storybook Artists (Illus.), Random House/Disney,
$9.99
9. “A Day in the Sun,” Frank Berrios, RH Disney (Illus.),
Random House/Disney, $3.99
10. “Good Night, Gorilla,” Peggy Rathmann,
Putnam, $7.99
11. “Where the Wild Things Are,” Maurice Sendak,
Harper, $18.99
12. “Pat the Bunny,” Dorothy Kunhardt,
Golden, $9.99
13. “A Tale of Dragons,” Fabio Laguna,
Simon Spotlight, $3.99
14. “Make Way for Ducklings,” Robert McCloskey,
Puffin, $7.99
15. “Little Blue Truck,” Alice Schertle, Jill McElmurry
(Illus.), Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $6.99
Fiction Series
1. “Divergent,” Veronica Roth, Katherine Tegen Books
2. “Magic Tree House,” Mary Pope Osborne, Sal
Murdocca (Illus.), Random House
3. “The Maze Runner,” James Dashner, Delacorte
4. “Mortal Instruments,” Cassandra Clare, Margaret K.
McElderry Books
5. “Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children,” Ransom Riggs,
Quirk
6. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid,” Jeff Kinney, Amulet
7. “Ivy & Bean,” Annie Barrows, Sophie Blackall (Illus.),
Chronicle
8. “Elephant & Piggie,” Mo Willems, Hyperion
9. “The Heroes of Olympus,” Rick Riordan, Hyperion
10. “Harry Potter,” J.K. Rowling,
Scholastic/Arthur A. Levine Books
18 THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 The Inyo Register
The Inyo Register THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014 19
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As I neared the
center of the
bridge she turned
toward me and I
said hello. What
was interesting
was that her
initial look at me
was one of joy
and relief, as
though she were
expecting me.
When she realized
that I was a
stranger that look
faded.
The author, inset and above, standing on the very footbridge featured at the center of his story.
Photos courtesy Ralph Shaffer
By Ralph E. Shaffer
(The following is a piece of
fiction inspired by the
author’s visits to
Independence. –Ed.)
The annual Fourth of
July parade and barbecue at
Independence were over and
I was about to leave town. I
hadn’t come here for either.
I was merely passing
through, headed north, but
U.S. 395, once known as “El
Camino Sierra,” was blocked
off at the south end of town
to accommodate the parade.
There was a detour route
but I decided to stop. The
parade was just starting and
it proved to be interesting
with all those mules, bands
and so forth. I should have
been on my way immediately
afterward, but I lingered, and
that’s why I’m writing this.
When the parade ended
and before the barbecue
began, I wandered over to
The Footbridge crossing
Independence Creek. It’s in
Dehy Park, where the old
narrow gauge locomotive
sits, awaiting restoration.
The barbecue usually took
place here but because of
some unfinished renovation
of the facilities Dehy Park
was empty and everyone was
at the other park at the
south end of town, awaiting
the roast beef.
But I noticed a solitary fig-
ure standing in the middle of
the bridge. An elderly
woman, neatly dressed, tall.
A rather impressive-looking
lady. And I was puzzled.
Why would she be standing
alone on The Footbridge
while everyone else was at
the barbecue?
At the risk of being rude
and to satisfy my curiosity, I
ambled over to the bridge
and, with some hesitation, I
must admit, started across.
She stood in mid-bridge, fac-
ing the mountains although
foliage on the trees along the
creek pretty well obscured
the view.
As I neared the center of
the bridge she turned toward
me and I said hello. What
was interesting was that her
initial look at me was one of
joy and relief, as though she
were expecting me. When
she realized that I was a
stranger that look faded.
I asked her why she
wasn’t at the other park,
enjoying the barbecue. I real-
ly didn’t expect the response
I got. As she told me why
she was on the bridge, I was
sorry I had walked out to
where she stood.
She told me that she lived
in Independence, was a long-
time widow. I made some
comment about The
Footbridge. Her reply was
that she liked the old wood-
en one better. It had been
replaced a few years ago by
this metal bridge. Safer, the
town officials said, but it
wasn’t the same.
She said she always went
to the Fourth of July events.
At the end of the parade
today, as she headed for
home to rest up for the bar-
becue, she felt a tap on her
shoulder, turned around …
here she paused for a long
moment … and there was a
man in a drum major’s uni-
form. She remembered see-
ing him in the parade, an
older, ramrod straight, ener-
getic fellow leading the Old-
Timers’ band.
He apologized but wanted
to know where the
Courthouse was. He told her
he had heard Independence
had this fabled structure and
he wanted to see it. She told
me that his question was a
little odd since the court-
house is the largest building
on the street and the parade
had gone by it. Twice. The
town is so short that the
parade goes up the street
and then back again. But she
suppressed her look of incre-
dulity and pointed out the
building, which can be seen
from almost any place along
the street.
He thanked her, but
instead of heading off to the
courthouse he engaged her
in conversation. She had to
admit that he was a fascinat-
ing man, telling her in
response to her questions of
his interest in bands, his life
as a music teacher, his failed
marriage, and on and on. But
she wasn’t bored. She was
somehow captivated by the
friendly, sincere way he con-
versed with her.
He said his name was
Harold, but she also detected
a muffled snicker as he said
it and she wasn’t really sure
that was his name.
They stood there on the
street for maybe half an
hour. By then the crowds
had cleared and the street
was largely empty except for
the clean-up crews picking
up after the mules and hors-
es, and removing all the litter
left by those watching the
parade.
Finally, he said he had to
make some arrangements for
transporting the band back
to wherever they came from,
but before he left he told her
how much he had enjoyed
their conversation, and oh,
he had heard there was a
footbridge in Dehy Park that
had a wonderful view of the
mountains and wouldn’t she
meet him there … in 15 min-
utes to point out some of the
peaks in the Sierra?
She was at a loss for a
reply. She had been to The
Footbridge many times, [par-
ticularly when she was a girl
growing up in Independence
but it had been years since
she had been there. Her
attempts to decline, however,
were overcome by his repeat-
ed insistence that she meet
him there. And when she
finally agreed, with some
reluctance, he said he would
hurry with his job of arrang-
ing for the bus out of town.
They would meet on The
Footbridge in 15 minutes.
Fifteen minutes!
The sun now was drop-
ping toward the mountains
and the fifteen minutes had
turned into more like two
hours. No one had come to
the bridge, except me. She
should have left long ago,
but was compelled to stay by
a feeling that she couldn’t
express to me, but I under-
stood.
I noticed a look of sad-
ness on her face. I assured
her that he would probably
soon be there, although I
didn’t believe that, and she
didn’t either, I’m sure. And
as I left I hoped that I would
meet that tall, good-looking
elderly drum major heading
hurriedly toward The
Footbridge. But I doubted
that I would.
Instead, as I headed for
my car, ready to leave
Independence, I passed a
On the footbridge: A July 4 in Independence
chartered bus with a group
of old men loading their
musical instruments into the
cargo area. A few were stand-
ing near the doorway, listen-
ing to a tall, erect old gentle-
man, who could have been
the drum major of the
group, now in street clothes,
joking about his escapades
with the ladies of the town.
I hoped that when the bus
was about to pull out that
the old drum major would
shout “Wait!” and he would
leave the bus, saying he’d
catch Eastern Sierra Transit
and see them at home later,
that he remembered he was
supposed to meet someone. I
hoped that, but I didn’t really
think it would happen.
At the bulletin board,
along the sidewalk near my
car, stood another old gentle-
man, trying to read the town
map posted there. He was
obviously having difficulty
finding something on it and
before I unlocked my car I
asked if I could help. He said
he had come up from Lone
Pine for the parade and bar-
becue but as he was about
to leave town the drum
major of one of the bands
had suggested to him that
he ought to see The
Footbridge. But it wasn’t on
the map and the old fellow
wanted to know if I could
direct him to it.
I smiled and extolled The
Footbridge as best I could.
He graciously accepted my
offer to drive him there, and
as he left my car at Dehy
Park and headed toward The
Footbridge I could still see a
solitary woman, tall, neatly
dressed, standing in the mid-
dle of the bridge.
(Ralph E. Shaffer is profes-
sor emeritus of history at Cal
Poly Pomona. He is a frquent
visitor of Independence and
can be reached at reshaffer@
csupomona.edu.)
READERS VOTED
and we produced the results in our first annual
Best of Inyo County publication.
You can find the publication on our
web site at www.inyoregister.com
or stop by our office for a copy.
The Inyo Register
1180 N. Main St., Ste. 108 • Bishop • (760) 873-3535
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THURSDAY, JULY 3, 2014
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Dan and Daniel McGrew, from Ojai, ended the day with an impres-
sive stringer at Sabrina, including a 2-lb., 8-oz. rainbow.
Photo submitted
FISHING REPORT
Summary and Trail Report
And summer keeps rolling along with what snow is left at
the passes quickly receding and wildflowers popping up every-
where. More and more thru-hikers doing parts of the John
Muir Trail, Pacific Crest Trail or the Sierra High Route are
showing up to resupply as conditions continue to open up and
backcountry access gets better.
Still some talk of high water flows in the feeder streams and
Kings River headwaters while what little snow we did get this
winter melts off fast with the incredible summer weather
we’ve been getting. The packers are almost ready to get over
Bishop Pass, too which should even further open up access to
the high country for eager folks looking to enjoy the best of
the High Sierra.
Wild Trout anglers are still reporting excellent fly fishing
and spin fishing in the backcountry lakes of the Bishop Creek
Canyon including the Piute Pass area, Lamarck Lakes, Green
Lakes Basin, Bishop Pass drainage and Sabrina Basin.
Bishop Creek South Fork
The creek just kept producing all week for both the bait
folks, fly fishers and lure tossers. Creek flows are still steady
and a bit on the high side but perfectly fishable. Best baits
were half crawlers and salmon eggs, best flies were just about
all small dries and large black ants and mini-jigs, Panther
Martins & Berkley Mice Tails for the lure folks. Anglers working
multiple stretches of the stream did best as now that we’re two
months into the fishing season the fish are starting to spread
out a bit.
Weir Pond
Morning and evening hatches have made the Weir the hot
spot for those who love fishing dries. It’s mostly the smaller
model brookies and brownies rising but even some of the
hatchery rainbows are being taken on the dries as well. Humpy,
parachute adams, mosquito and elk hair caddis are among the
patterns enticing strikes. The spin fishers are doing well also
on worms, salmon eggs as well as mini-jigs and trout worms
in various colors.
Willow Pond (beaver pond across from Willow
Campground)
Usually somewhat of a sleeper spot in the canyon, we
received multiple reports of excellent fishing from the few
shore accessible spots as well as a dynamite bite for fly fishers
with waders. Pretty much the same fly selection as Weir will do
you right.
Intake II
As busy as it was this weekend, not much in the way of
reports from this location this week but the big news was an
8-lb., 5-oz. rainbow caught by a young gal named Macy Terhark
from Laguna Hills on a black fly.
Lake Sabrina
Nothing but good news coming out of Lake Sabrina, espe-
cially for boaters making the run to the back of the lake to fish
the main inlet. Multiple groups reported the bite to be “wide
open” on just about anything in the tackle box. Bait and wait
folks did well from shore on PowerBait and Gulp Eggs about
midway back towards the inlet.
– Courtesy Parchers Resort
Lake Sabrina Boat Landing
Lots of visitors cooling off at the lake this weekend. And
cool it was with highs in the upper 70s and a cool breeze com-
ing off the lake.
Saturday, July 5 is Free Fishing Day. Anglers don’t need a
license on that day to fish, but do need to abide by all the fish-
ing regulations.
Catching is off the charts – loads of full stringers coming
out and reports of oodles of fish being caught and released.
Nightcrawlers and PowerBait are on the menu at the Inlets, the
DingleBerry Inlet in the back right-hand corner, the Little
George Inlet in the back left-hand corner and the George Inlet
about 200 yards toward the dam.
If you’re trolling, give lures with a bit of red a try dragging
a nightcrawler. Sitting in a boat and still-fishing, try the coves
with PowerBait or salmon eggs or drifting in the channels with
nightcrawlers. For kicking back on shore and enjoying the cool
weather, just about any bait is working there.
Daniel McGrew along with Dan (dad) of Ojai landed a nice
2-lb., 8-oz. rainbow on PowerBait while Julio Hurtado along
with sons Julio Jr. and Joshua of Riverside caught dinner using
salmon peach PowerBait. Sean Bozigian of Palmdale nabbed a
2-lb., 12-oz beaut using a green jig. Cheryl Iwata and Ryan Iseri
limited out in about four-and-a-half hours using rainbow and
chartreuse PowerBait over near the spillway. Bo Pisarchuk,
John May, Dwight Swearingen and Dustin Paladino from
Southern California had some good times hooking into quite a
few fish with lures and PowerBait.
This past weekend was the 11th Table Mountain Annual
Fishing Invitational. The winner for the fourth time was Carlee
Barnes snagging a 2-pounder with a nightcrawler.
– Courtesy Lake Sabrina Boat Landing
Don’t toss ’em!
Recycle ’em!
Don’t toss ’em!
Recycle ’em!
The Inyo Register The Inyo Register
www.inyoregister.com www.inyoregister.com
Intake II has been producing some seriously huge catches this season.
Photo submitted
Summer is in full swing
with the Fourth of July right
around the corner and that
means it is going to be a busy
fishing weekend. With the
swollen crowds, let us keep in
mind that there are hundreds
of lakes within walking dis-
tance from the road and the
farther your walking distance
the more likely you are to have
a little room to yourself.
The East Walker River out
of Bridgeport is currently
reporting flows around 100
cubic feet per second; this is
higher than we have seen the
past few weeks and makes for
some better fishing. The
Bridgeport Reservoir is also
still offering some good fish-
ing. With the hotter tempera-
tures on the forecast for the
following weeks try heading
west out of Bridgeport towards
the Twin Lakes area. The fish-
ing out of Twin Lakes has been
great over the past few weeks
and the slightly higher eleva-
tion makes for cooler days.
The Outdoorsman
Beat the heat and the holiday
crowds at backcountry lakes
Sierra Roller Hockey
League Fireworks
Locals can celebrate the
Fourth of July and help the
Sierra Roller Hockey League
all at the same time.
The SRHL will be selling
fireworks in the Mahogany
Smoked Meats parking lot
at 2345 N. Sierra Hwy. in
Bishop through the July 4
holiday.
Freedom in Motion
Board Meeting
The Board of Directors
for the Freedom in Motion
Therapeutic Riding Center
will hold its meeting at
12:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 8
at the Bishop Pizza Factory.
Plans for the end of sum-
mer luau are on the agen-
da.
Call (760) 933-2606 for
more information. The Pizza
Factory is located at 970 N.
Main St., Bishop.
SPORT
SHORTS
ALLEN HIGGINBOTHAM
COLUMNIST
at the inlets on a fairly spo-
radic schedule so any time of
day could yield favorable
results.
This week I hiked up the
Pine Creek Pass Trail to check
out the upper Pine Lakes. The
first lake, Pine Creek Lake, had
lots of hungry fish and was
absolutely beautiful. Very few
people hike up toward these
lakes due to the steep approach
trail out of Pine Creek Canyon
and I would recommend it as a
great option for the busy
Fourth of July weekend. Get an
early start: the trail receives
early morning sun and heats
up quickly. Upper Pine Creek
Lake is currently infested with
mosquitoes. You have been
warned.
South Lake and Sabrina are
still at very low water levels
but that does not mean the
fishing is suffering. I have been
having the most success
around the far side of South
Lake at first light and have also
been pleasantly surprised with
a few nice browns in the same
areas around dusk.
When the crowds get busy,
like on the Fourth of July week-
end, I like to remember a little
fishing etiquette. First and
foremost, give everyone some
space. If you see another angler
fishing an area you want to
fish, its best not to crowd
them. Just continue moving up
stream. Lakes are different of
course, but still remember that
you do not want to crowd your
fellow anglers. Give everyone a
few yards so no one is acci-
dently hooking a fellow angler.
Also remember that fish have
good eyes and are always look-
ing for predators like you. As
you walk up stream you are
passing through the fish’s
vision and you could spook
another angler’s fish if you are
not careful. Remember to walk
with your rod sticking out
behind you; this makes it less
likely to spook fish and pro-
tects your equipment from
getting damaged.
(Allen Higginbotham gradu-
ated from Florida State
University and promptly moved
to Yosemite Valley when he
was 23. He later migrated from
Yosemite Valley to the Eastern
Sierra and has been living here
for the past five years. He
spends all his free time explor-
ing the beautiful Owens Valley
and Eastern Sierra Nevada per-
fecting his skills as a naturalist,
mountaineer and conservation-
ist. Keep an eye out for him
next time you are hiking a high
pass or fishing a remote alpine
lake.)
The flow in Rush Creek has
dropped significantly to
around 25 CFS making the
quality of the fishing slightly
worse than before. Silver Lake
and Grant Lake have been see-
ing a lot of action but Grant is
currently experiencing
extremely low water level. Your
best bet in the June Lake area
is to fish Silver Lake and then
have a meal at the Silver Lake
resort after you finish fishing.
This Fourth of July week-
end would be a great time to
hike up from the Rock Creek
trailhead toward some of the
higher lakes for a bit of alpine
fishing. The upper lakes will be
cooler and I have been seeing
some fish breaking the surface
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